Advertisement

 

 

Acceptability of HIV Testing Sites Among Rural and Urban African Americans Who Use Cocaine.

Acceptability of HIV Testing Sites Among Rural and Urban African Americans Who Use Cocaine.
Author Information (click to view)

Keith Branham D, Borders TF, Stewart KE, Curran GM, Booth BM,


Keith Branham D, Borders TF, Stewart KE, Curran GM, Booth BM, (click to view)

Keith Branham D, Borders TF, Stewart KE, Curran GM, Booth BM,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

AIDS and behavior 2016 8 24()

Abstract

African Americans (AAs) who use cocaine in the Southern region of the U.S. have a relatively high risk of HIV and need for HIV testing. Among this group, those residing in rural areas may have less favorable opinions about common HIV testing sites, which could inhibit HIV testing. We examined rural/urban variations in their acceptability of multiple HIV testing sites (private physician clinic, local health department, community health center, community HIV fair, hospital emergency department, blood plasma donation center, drug abuse treatment facility, and mobile van or community outreach worker). Results from partial proportional odds and logistic regression analyses indicate that rural AA who use cocaine have lower odds of viewing local health departments (OR = 0.09, 95 % CI = 0.03-0.21), physician offices (OR = 0.19, 95 % CI = 0.09-0.42), and drug use treatment centers (OR = 0.49; 95 % CI = 0.30-0.80) as acceptable relative to their urban counterparts. The findings have implications for further targeting HIV testing toward AAs who use of cocaine, particularly those residing in the rural South.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

three × 4 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]