CME: Low-Dose CT for Lung Cancer Screening

CME: Low-Dose CT for Lung Cancer Screening
Author Information (click to view)

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Medicine
The Pulmonary Center
Boston University Medical Center
Adjunct Faculty
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice
Core Investigator
Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research
Bedford VAMC

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that she has no financial interests to disclose.

Figure 1 (click to view)
Target Audience (click to view)

This activity is designed to meet the needs of physicians.

Learning Objectives(click to view)

Upon completion of the educational activity, participants should be able to:

 

  • Review the American Thoracic Society’s and American College of Chest Physicians’ policy statement on the implementation of low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening programs in clinical practice.

Method of Participation(click to view)

Statements of credit will be awarded based on the participant reviewing monograph, correctly answer 2 out of 3 questions on the post test, completing and submitting an activity evaluation.  A statement of credit will be available upon completion of an online evaluation/claimed credit form at www.akhcme.com/pwMay01.  You must participate in the entire activity to receive credit.  If you have questions about this CME/CE activity, please contact AKH Inc. at dcotterman@akhcme.com.

Credit Available(click to view)

AKH

CME Credit Provided by AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare

Physicians
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare and Physician’s Weekly’s.  AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support(click to view)

There is no commercial support for this activity.

Disclosures(click to view)

It is the policy of AKH Inc. to ensure independence, balance, objectivity, scientific rigor, and integrity in all of its continuing education activities. The author must disclose to the participants any significant relationships with commercial interests whose products or devices may be mentioned in the activity or with the commercial supporter of this continuing education activity. Identified conflicts of interest are resolved by AKH prior to accreditation of the activity and may include any of or combination of the following: attestation to non-commercial content; notification of independent and certified CME/CE expectations; referral to National Author Initiative training; restriction of topic area or content; restriction to discussion of science only; amendment of content to eliminate discussion of device or technique; use of other author for discussion of recommendations; independent review against criteria ensuring evidence support recommendation; moderator review; and peer review.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use & Investigational Product(click to view)

This educational activity may include discussion of uses of agents that are investigational and/or unapproved by the FDA. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer(click to view)

This course is designed solely to provide the healthcare professional with information to assist in his/her practice and professional development and is not to be considered a diagnostic tool to replace professional advice or treatment. The course serves as a general guide to the healthcare professional, and therefore, cannot be considered as giving legal, nursing, medical, or other professional advice in specific cases. AKH Inc. specifically disclaim responsibility for any adverse consequences resulting directly or indirectly from information in the course, for undetected error, or through participant’s misunderstanding of the content.

Faculty & Credentials(click to view)

FACULTY DISCLOSURES

Christopher Cole – Senior Editor
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers.
Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers:
AKH and PHYSICIAN WEEKLY’S STAFF/REVIEWERS

Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN- CE Director of Accreditation
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers.

AKH planners and reviewers have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

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Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH (click to view)

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Medicine
The Pulmonary Center
Boston University Medical Center
Adjunct Faculty
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice
Core Investigator
Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research
Bedford VAMC

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that she has no financial interests to disclose.

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Experts have released a policy statement on the implementation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs in clinical practice. The statement addresses steps that should be considered during the planning, implementation, and maintenance of LDCT screening programs.
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The American Thoracic Society and American College of Chest Physicians recently developed a policy statement on the successful implementation of comprehensive low-radiation-dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening programs that are safe, effective, and sustainable. This type of screening has been shown to reduce risks for lung cancer-related mortality. However, there is a continued need for guidance in this area. LDCT screening is a complex process, and few healthcare providers have experience managing the challenges that come with starting these programs.

“There is an important need for an infrastructure for the initial screening CT scan as well as for the evaluation of pulmonary nodules and other abnormalities that are commonly detected on screening,” says Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH, who helped develop the policy statement document. “There is also a need to be prepared to treat any cancers that may be detected.” The policy statement refers to three phases of LDCT lung cancer screening program development: 1) planning, 2) implementation, and 3) maintenance.

 

Planning

“For the planning phase, we recommend the coordination of a multidisciplinary steering committee to oversee the screening program,” says Dr. Wiener. “This includes representation from pulmonology, thoracic surgery, radiology, primary care, medical center leadership, oncology, and radiation oncology. We also recommend educating and engaging primary care providers to ensure they understand the nuances of lung cancer screening. In most cases, primary care providers will be the ones who need to offer lung cancer screening to their patients. They will also need to be involved in the shared decision-making process required by Medicare.”

Dr. Wiener explains that obtaining buy-in from local leadership is important in order to ensure they will be supportive of LDCT screening programs. “It can be an expensive undertaking,” she says, “and establishing a business model with leadership’s support can help provide a sense of the financial implications of starting a program. It’s also important in the planning phase to market the program, within the medical center and perhaps to the public, so that they know it’s available.”

 

Implementation

For the implementation phase, the policy statement recommends establishing systems for ensuring that screening is offered only to eligible patients. “It’s also important to establish a system for shared decision making,” says Dr. Wiener. “Tools, such as patient decision aids, should be available to facilitate shared decision making by explaining the pros and cons of lung cancer screening [Table].”

The policy statement recommends standardizing the entire process, including:

  • Use of a low dose of CT scans used for screening.
  • A template for radiologists to report CT results.
  • A process for evaluating any nodules or abnormalities detected on CT scans.
  • A method for ensuring that patients adhere to the follow-up process.
  • An approach for reporting screening results to patients.

 

Maintenance

The maintenance phase focuses on monitoring the LDCT cancer screening program to ensure it meets quality standards. “It’s important to have a method for tracking any pulmonary nodules that are detected and ensuring that evaluation is appropriate,” says Dr. Wiener. “While Medicare requires this information be submitted to a registry, evidence suggest that a registry alone may be insufficient for ensuring follow-up. A dedicated person is needed to oversee the whole process and make sure all parties recognize who is responsible for following up on nodules.”

 

Considerations

The most obvious benefit of LDCT lung cancer screening is the potential to decrease lung cancer-related mortality, but Dr. Wiener says there are other benefits to consider (Table). “This screening can reassure anxious patients and provide a teachable moment to encourage people to quit smoking,” she says. “However, it’s also important to consider the harms associated with LDCT screening, including the high false positive rate of lung cancer screening, physical complications from biopsy or surgical resections, and the emotional distress related to ongoing surveillance. Other possible harms include radiation exposure, potential false reassurance, and over-diagnoses of clinically insignificant tumors.”

The policy statement is directed mostly for helping medical personnel develop safe and effective LDCT lung cancer screening programs, according to Dr. Wiener. However, it also includes tools that are helpful in daily practice. “These tools include patient decision aids and offer physicians pragmatic advice about the whole lung cancer screening process.”

 

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine for The Pulmonary Center at Boston University Medical Center; an Adjunct Faculty member at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice; and a Core Investigator for the Center for Healthcare Organization & Implementation Research at Bedford VAMC.

Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD, MPH, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that she has no financial interests to disclose.

Readings & Resources (click to view)

Wiener R, Gould M, Arenberg D, et al. An official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians policy statement: implementation of low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening programs in clinical practice. Am J Resp Crit Care Med. 2015;192:881-891. Available at www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/rccm.201508-1671ST#.ViaBGH6rRph.

Aberle D, Adams A, Berg C, et al. Reduced lung-cancer mortality with low-dose computed tomographic screening. N Engl J Med. 2011;365:395-409.

Detterbeck F, Mazzone P, Naidich D, Bach P. Screening for lung cancer. Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Chest. 2013;143:e78S-e92S.

Moyer V. Screening for lung cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2014;160:330-338

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