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Colonoscopy Findings in HIV-Infected Men and Women from an Urban U.S. Cohort Compared with Non-HIV-Infected Men and Women.

Colonoscopy Findings in HIV-Infected Men and Women from an Urban U.S. Cohort Compared with Non-HIV-Infected Men and Women.
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Fantry LE, Nowak RG, Fisher LH, Cullen NR, Yimgang DP, Stafford KA, Riedel DJ, Kang M, Innis EK, Riner A, Wang EW, Charurat ME,


Fantry LE, Nowak RG, Fisher LH, Cullen NR, Yimgang DP, Stafford KA, Riedel DJ, Kang M, Innis EK, Riner A, Wang EW, Charurat ME, (click to view)

Fantry LE, Nowak RG, Fisher LH, Cullen NR, Yimgang DP, Stafford KA, Riedel DJ, Kang M, Innis EK, Riner A, Wang EW, Charurat ME,

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AIDS research and human retroviruses 2016 7 21()

Abstract
INTRODUCTION
As HIV-infected patients live longer, non-AIDS-defining cancers are now a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence, type, and location of colorectal neoplastic lesions found on colonoscopy in HIV-infected patients from an urban U.S. cohort with non-HIV-infected patients.

METHODS
We collected clinical data and colonoscopy findings on 263 HIV-infected patients matched with 657 non-HIV-infected patients on age, race, and sex. Frequency distributions and descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study population. The primary exposure was HIV infection, and the primary outcome was any adenoma or adenocarcinoma. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS
Participants were primarily African American and 40% were women. HIV-infected patients were less likely to have any neoplastic lesions (21.3% vs. 27.7%, p < .05), adenoma (20.5% vs. 27.1%, p = .04), tubular adenomas >10 mm (0.4% vs. 2.9%, p = .02), and serrated adenomas (0.0% vs.2.6%, p = <.01). There was a nonsignificant increased prevalence of adenocarcinoma in HIV-infected individuals compared with non-HIV-infected individuals (1.5% vs. 0.8%, p = .29). The lower prevalence of any adenoma remained after controlling for age, sex, smoking status, body-mass index, and diabetes mellitus [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88]. HIV-infected patients had a lower prevalence of colorectal neoplastic lesions, including high-risk adenomas, than non-HIV-infected patients. CONCLUSIONS
Our findings suggest that HIV infection in a primarily African American population is associated with a lower prevalence of colorectal adenomas, but not adenocarcinoma, found by colonoscopy.

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