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Evaluation of four commercial virological assays for early infant HIV-1 diagnosis using dried blood specimens.

Evaluation of four commercial virological assays for early infant HIV-1 diagnosis using dried blood specimens.
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Alvarez P, Prieto L, Martín L, Obiang J, Avedillo P, Vargas A, Rojo P, Fernández McPhee C, Sanz Canalejas L, Benito A, Tomás Ramos J, Holguín Á,


Alvarez P, Prieto L, Martín L, Obiang J, Avedillo P, Vargas A, Rojo P, Fernández McPhee C, Sanz Canalejas L, Benito A, Tomás Ramos J, Holguín Á, (click to view)

Alvarez P, Prieto L, Martín L, Obiang J, Avedillo P, Vargas A, Rojo P, Fernández McPhee C, Sanz Canalejas L, Benito A, Tomás Ramos J, Holguín Á,

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Pediatric research 2016 9 21() doi 10.1038/pr.2016.183

Abstract

BackgroundEarly infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV-1 is necessary to reduce HIV-related mortality. As maternal antibodies transferred across the placenta may persist up to 18 months, commercial virological assays (CVAs) are needed. This study compares four CVAs for EID using dried blood specimens (DBS) from HIV-1-exposed-infants.MethodsDBS from 68 infants born to HIV-1-infected women were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 in Equatorial Guinea. Four CVAs were performed: Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 kPCR assay, Roche CAP/CTM Quantitative Test v2.0, CAP/CTM Qualitative Tests v1.0 and v2.0. Definitive diagnosis was established following WHO recommendations.ResultsTwo HIV-1 infected infants (2.9%) were detected by the four CVAs while 49 (72%) resulted negative. Discordant results were observed in 17 (25%) infants and HIV-1 infection was excluded in 14 patients when virological and serological testing was performed in additional DBS. Different false positive rates HIV-1 were observed with Roche assays.ConclusionCVAs using DBS were useful for EID, although discrepant results were common. Further research is required to reduce false positive results that could result in wrong diagnosis and unneeded treatment. We propose caution with low viral load (VL) values when using VL assays. Clear guidelines are required for EID of HIV-exposed-infants with discrepant virological results.

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