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Factors Associated with Returning At-Home Specimen Collection Kits for HIV Testing among Internet-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men.

Factors Associated with Returning At-Home Specimen Collection Kits for HIV Testing among Internet-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men.
Author Information (click to view)

Ricca AV, Hall EW, Khosropour CM, Sullivan PS,


Ricca AV, Hall EW, Khosropour CM, Sullivan PS, (click to view)

Ricca AV, Hall EW, Khosropour CM, Sullivan PS,

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Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care 2016 9 15() pii

Abstract
BACKGROUND
In the United States, men who have sex with men (MSM) are known to disproportionately have HIV. The authors sought to describe the acceptability of providing at-home dried blood spot specimen collection kits for HIV testing among MSM.

METHODS
Between August 2010 and December 2010, the authors recruited Internet-using, HIV-negative or -unknown MSM to participate in a 12-month study of behavioral risks. Eligible participants were mailed an at-home HIV test.

RESULTS
Of the 896 men who were sent a test kit, 735 (82%) returned the kit. Returning a test kit was significantly associated with race (P = .002), highest level of education (P = .012), and annual income (P = .026). The adjusted odds of black, non-Hispanic men returning a test kit were about half of the odds of white, non-Hispanic men returning a test kit (adjusted odds ratios: 0.49; 95% confidence intervals: 0.31-0.78).

CONCLUSIONS
Men who have sex with men are willing to provide biological specimens as part of an Internet-based HIV prevention study.

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