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[Features and influencing factors of self-discrimination among HIV/AIDS patients according to sex].

[Features and influencing factors of self-discrimination among HIV/AIDS patients according to sex].
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Ju LH, Lyu P, Xu P, Chen WY, He HJ, Ma LP,


Ju LH, Lyu P, Xu P, Chen WY, He HJ, Ma LP, (click to view)

Ju LH, Lyu P, Xu P, Chen WY, He HJ, Ma LP,

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Zhonghua yu fang yi xue za zhi [Chinese journal of preventive medicine] 50(10) 863-868 doi 10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-9624.2016.10.006

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the features and influencing factors of self-discrimination among patients with HIV/AIDS according to sex. Methods: A total of 2 432 HIV/AIDS patients were recruited in Yunnan, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Shanxi, Jilin, and Inner Mongolia provinces by a multistage stratified cluster sampling method, based on HIV epidemic and transmission modes, from May 2013 to October 2013. All participants were ≥18 years old, and we excluded those with mental disorders, hearing loss or other factors that prevented them from properly answering questions, and those who were unwilling to participate. A self-designed questionnaire was conducted to collect information about self-discrimination features and social behavior changes among HIV/AIDS patients. Differences in performance and self-discrimination features between participants of different sexes were compared using the chi-squared test. Factors influencing self-discrimination were analyzed by sex, using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of the 2 432 cases, 78.9%(1 918 cases)were male and 21.1%(514 cases)female. The proportion of self-discrimination overall was 76.1%(1 850 cases); this proportion among female HIV/AIDS patients was 80.5%(414 cases), which was higher than that among men(74.9%, 1 436 cases)(χ(2)=7.17, P=0.007). Of the 11 forms of self-discrimination performance, proportions of feeling guilt, shame, and self-abasement among participants were greater than 50%. Proportions of feeling shame, inferiority, and blaming others among females were 61.3%, 59.5%, and 45.3%, respectively, which were higher than these among males(49.8%, 50.0%, 28.4%, respectively)(P<0.01). Multivariate unconditional logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of self-discrimination among those with HIV confirmatory testing time ≥1 year was higher than those with HIV confirmatory testing time <1 year(females: OR=35.67, 95%CI:17.28-73.64; males: OR=8.74, 95% CI:6.79-11.25). Compared with other occupations, the risk of self-discrimination among male farm workers was higher(OR=1.62, 95% CI:1.03-2.54). The risks of self-discrimination in males who had been infected with HIV by transmission routes of blood transfusion or blood collection(OR=2.38, 95% CI:1.31-4.30), injection drug use(OR=1.78, 95% CI:1.09-2.91), and male-to-male sexual behavior(OR=1.48, 95%CI:1.08-2.03)were higher than in males infected via heterosexual behavior. Conclusion: Female HIV/AIDS patients are more likely to engage in self-discrimination than male patients. Self-discrimination mainly takes the form of feeling remorse, shame, and inferiority. Confirmatory testing time ≥1 year, occupation as a farm work, and routes of transmission via blood transfusion or collection, injection drug use, and male-to-male sexual behavior are influencing factors of self-discrimination among male HIV/AIDS patients. Confirmatory testing time ≥1 year is the influencing factor of self-discrimination among female HIV/AIDS patients.

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