Advertisement

 

 

HIV, Cocaine Use, and Hepatitis C Virus: A Triad of Nontraditional Risk Factors for Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease.

HIV, Cocaine Use, and Hepatitis C Virus: A Triad of Nontraditional Risk Factors for Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease.
Author Information (click to view)

Lucas GM, Atta MG, Fine DM, McFall AM, Estrella MM, Zook K, Stein JH,


Lucas GM, Atta MG, Fine DM, McFall AM, Estrella MM, Zook K, Stein JH, (click to view)

Lucas GM, Atta MG, Fine DM, McFall AM, Estrella MM, Zook K, Stein JH,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology 2016 9 8() pii

Abstract
OBJECTIVE
We assessed cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of 3 nontraditional cardiovascular disease risk factors-HIV, cocaine use, and chronic hepatitis C virus infection-with 3 validated markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease: carotid artery plaque, albuminuria, and aortic pulse wave velocity in a well-characterized cohort.

APPROACH AND RESULTS
We measured carotid plaque at baseline and after 24 months, urine albumin/creatinine ratio every 6 months, and pulse wave velocity annually for up to 36 months in a predominantly black cohort of 292 participants (100 HIV negative and 192 HIV positive). Thirty-nine percent had chronic hepatitis C virus infection and 20%, 28%, and 52% were never, past, and current cocaine users, respectively. Sixteen percent, 47%, and 64% of those with none, 1 or 2, or all 3 nontraditional risk factors had ≥2 abnormal cardiovascular disease risk markers (P=0.001). In fully adjusted models that included all 3 nontraditional risk factors, HIV infection was independently associated with carotid plaque progression (increase in the number of anatomic segments with plaque), albuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio >30 mg/g), albuminuria progression (doubling of albumin-creatinine ratio from baseline to a value >30 mg/g), and pulse wave velocity. Cocaine use was associated with an ≈3-fold higher odds of carotid plaque at baseline, and hepatitis C virus infection was significantly associated with a higher risk of carotid plaque progression.

CONCLUSIONS
These results suggest that HIV infection, cocaine use, and hepatitis C virus infection are important nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and highlight the need to understand the distinct and overlapping mechanisms of the associations.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

twelve − 2 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]