Advertisement

 

 

Integrating gender and sex to unpack trends in sexually transmitted infection surveillance data in British Columbia, Canada: an ethno-epidemiological study.

Integrating gender and sex to unpack trends in sexually transmitted infection surveillance data in British Columbia, Canada: an ethno-epidemiological study.
Author Information (click to view)

Knight R, Falasinnu T, Oliffe JL, Gilbert M, Small W, Goldenberg S, Shoveller J,


Knight R, Falasinnu T, Oliffe JL, Gilbert M, Small W, Goldenberg S, Shoveller J, (click to view)

Knight R, Falasinnu T, Oliffe JL, Gilbert M, Small W, Goldenberg S, Shoveller J,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

BMJ open 2016 08 266(8) e011209 doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011209

Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Surveillance data frequently indicate that young men and women experience high-yet considerably different-reported rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including bacterial infections such as chlamydia. We examined how several sex-based (eg, biological) and gender-based (eg, sociocultural) factors may interact to influence STI surveillance data trends.

METHODS
Employing ethno-epidemiological techniques, we analysed cross-sectional qualitative data collected between 2006 and 2013 about young people’s experiences accessing STI testing services in five communities in British Columbia, Canada. These data included 250 semistructured interviews with young men and women aged 15-24 years, as well as 39 clinicians who provided STI testing services.

RESULTS
The findings highlight how young women are socially and medically encouraged to regularly test, while young men are rarely offered similar opportunities. Instead, young men tend to seek out testing services: (1) at the beginning or end of a sexual relationship; (2) after a high-risk sexual encounter; (3) after experiencing symptoms; or (4) based on concerns about ‘abnormal’ sexual anatomy. Our results illustrate how institutions and individuals align with stereotypical gender norms regarding sexual health responsibilities, STI testing and STI treatments. While these patterns reflect social phenomena, they also appear to intersect with sex-based, biological experiences of symptomatology in ways that might help to further explain systematic differences between young men’s and women’s patterns of testing for STIs.

CONCLUSIONS
The results point to the importance of taking a social and biological view to understanding the factors that contribute to the gap between young men’s and women’s routine engagement in STI care.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

one × one =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]