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July 2016 Briefing – HIV & AIDS

July 2016 Briefing – HIV & AIDS
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Here are highlights of the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for July 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

American Red Cross Says Blood Donations Needed Urgently

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The American Red Cross says it has an urgent need for blood donations, with less than a five-day supply of blood on hand to help those who need it.

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Medical Students Often Track Progress of Former Patients

TUESDAY, July 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Many U.S. medical students use electronic health records to track the progress of their former patients and confirm the accuracy of their diagnoses, according to research letter published online July 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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‘Walking Meetings’ Feasible Strategy for Employee Wellness

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Converting a single weekly meeting to a walking meeting can help raise work-related physical activity levels of white-collar workers, according to a report published online June 23 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Shared Drug Snorting Straws May Transmit Hepatitis C Virus

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Sharing snorting straws for noninjection drug use may be a source for hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission, according to research published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Rapid HIV Transmission Seen in Injection Drug Users in Rural U.S.

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. prescription drug abuse epidemic has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks in rural and suburban communities, where up to now the virus has posed little threat, according to a report published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Health Expenditures Rising for Middle Class, Wealthy

THURSDAY, July 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) — While overall U.S. medical spending growth slowed between 2004 and 2013, expenditures rose for middle- and high-income Americans, according to research published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Medicare Spending Up for Decedents Versus Survivors

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Medicare per capita spending was much higher for beneficiaries who died during 2014 than for those who survived the entire year, according to a report published by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Global Fight Against HIV Remains Challenging

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The number of HIV/AIDS deaths worldwide each year has fallen since peaking in 2005, but the number of new HIV infections is up in 74 countries, according to a study published online July 19 in The Lancet HIV to coincide with the 21st International AIDS Conference, held from July 18 to 22 in Durban, South Africa.

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Grindr Feasible for Distributing HIV Self-Tests to High-Risk MSM

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The social networking app Grindr is feasible for distributing HIV self-test kits to men who have sex with men (MSM), according to a study published online recently in Sexual Health.

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Labor Compensation, Purchased Goods, Service Biggest Spends

TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Labor compensation remains the single largest contributor to costs among physicians’ offices, hospitals, and outpatient care centers, according to a report published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Burnout Can Have Acute Personal, Professional Consequences

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Stress and burnout are increasingly prevalent among physicians, with serious personal and professional consequences, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Growth in U.S. Health Spending Set to Average 5.8 Percent

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Growth in U.S. health spending is expected to average 5.8 percent for 2015 to 2025, according to a study published in the July issue of Health Affairs.

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Supreme Court Ruling Could Impact Med School Admissions

THURSDAY, July 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling upholding the University of Texas at Austin’s consideration of race and ethnicity in college admissions has implications for medical schools, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Differences in Salary for Male, Female Faculty Physicians

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) — For physicians with faculty appointments at 24 U.S. public medical schools there are significant salary differences between men and women, even after adjustment for confounding variables, according to a study published online July 11 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Recommendations Updated for Use of Antiretroviral Tx in HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infection have been updated for adults, and published in the July 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

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Small HIV Infection Risk in Condomless Sex With Use of ART

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) — HIV transmission is highly unlikely among heterosexual couples who have sex without condoms when one partner carries the virus but takes antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published in the July 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

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VA Appealing to Physicians to Join Agency

FRIDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is appealing to physicians to join the agency as part of its recovery from a 2014 scandal linked to excessive wait times, according to a report published by the American Medical Association.

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Many Clinical Trials Are Not Listed in Data-Sharing Repository

WEDNESDAY, July 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Only about half of trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov are listed in the largest data-sharing repository, according to a research letter published online June 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Invasive Prenatal Testing Doesn’t Up HIV Transmission Risk

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) — For pregnant women with HIV infection, invasive prenatal testing does not increase the risk of vertical transmission, according to a study published online June 20 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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