Advertisement

 

 

Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Induces a Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent Activation of Inflammatory Functions in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells during Acute Hepatitis.

Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Induces a Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent Activation of Inflammatory Functions in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells during Acute Hepatitis.
Author Information (click to view)

Bleau C, Filliol A, Samson M, Lamontagne L,


Bleau C, Filliol A, Samson M, Lamontagne L, (click to view)

Bleau C, Filliol A, Samson M, Lamontagne L,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Journal of virology 2016 Sep 2990(20) 9096-113 doi 10.1128/JVI.01069-16

Abstract
UNLABELLED
Under physiological conditions, the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) mediate hepatic immune tolerance toward self or foreign antigens through constitutive expression of anti-inflammatory mediators. However, upon viral infection or Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation, LSECs can achieve proinflammatory functions, but their role in hepatic inflammation during acute viral hepatitis is unknown. Using the highly virulent mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3) and the attenuated variants 51.6-MHV3 and YAC-MHV3, exhibiting lower tropism for LSECs, we investigated in vivo and in vitro the consequence of LSEC infection on their proinflammatory profiles and the aggravation of acute hepatitis process. In vivo infection with virulent MHV3, in comparison to attenuated strains, resulted in fulminant hepatitis associated with higher hepatic viral load, tissue necrosis, and levels of inflammatory mediators and earlier recruitment of inflammatory cells. Such hepatic inflammatory disorders correlated with disturbed production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and vascular factors by LSECs. We next showed in vitro that infection of LSECs by the virulent MHV3 strain altered their production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and promoted higher release of proinflammatory and procoagulant factors and earlier cell damage than infection by attenuated strains. This higher replication and proinflammatory activation in LSECs by the virulent MHV3 strain was associated with a specific activation of TLR2 signaling by the virus. We provide evidence that TLR2 activation of LSCEs by MHV3 is an aggravating factor of hepatic inflammation and correlates with the severity of hepatitis. Taken together, these results indicate that preservation of the immunotolerant properties of LSECs during acute viral hepatitis is imperative in order to limit hepatic inflammation and damage.

IMPORTANCE
Viral hepatitis B and C infections are serious health problems affecting over 350 million and 170 million people worldwide, respectively. It has been suggested that a balance between protection and liver damage mediated by the host’s immune response during the acute phase of infection would be determinant in hepatitis outcome. Thus, it appears crucial to identify the factors that predispose in exacerbating liver inflammation to limit hepatocyte injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) can express both anti- and proinflammatory functions, but their role in acute viral hepatitis has never been investigated. Using mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infections as animal models of viral hepatitis, we report for the first time that in vitro and in vivo infection of LSECs by the pathogenic MHV3 serotype leads to a reversion of their intrinsic anti-inflammatory phenotype toward a proinflammatory profile as well to as disorders in vascular factors, correlating with the severity of hepatitis. These results highlight a new virus-promoted mechanism of exacerbation of liver inflammatory response during acute hepatitis.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

fourteen + thirteen =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]