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Neighborhood Characteristics and Cardiovascular Risk among Older People in Japan: Findings from the JAGES Project.

Neighborhood Characteristics and Cardiovascular Risk among Older People in Japan: Findings from the JAGES Project.
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Inoue Y, Stickley A, Yazawa A, Shirai K, Amemiya A, Kondo N, Kondo K, Ojima T, Hanazato M, Suzuki N, Fujiwara T,


Inoue Y, Stickley A, Yazawa A, Shirai K, Amemiya A, Kondo N, Kondo K, Ojima T, Hanazato M, Suzuki N, Fujiwara T, (click to view)

Inoue Y, Stickley A, Yazawa A, Shirai K, Amemiya A, Kondo N, Kondo K, Ojima T, Hanazato M, Suzuki N, Fujiwara T,

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PloS one 2016 Oct 711(10) e0164525 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0164525
Abstract

Previous studies have found an association between neighborhood characteristics (i.e., aspects of the physical and social environment) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated CVD risk. This study investigated the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk among older people in Japan where research on this association is scarce. Data came from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study project; questionnaire data collected from 3,810 people aged 65 years or older living in 20 primary school districts in Aichi prefecture, Japan, was linked to a computed composite CVD risk score based on biomarker data (i.e., hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate). A sex-stratified multilevel linear regression analysis revealed that for male participants, living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived occurrence of traffic accidents and reduced personal safety was associated with an elevated CVD risk (coefficient = 1.08 per interquartile range increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30 to 1.86) whereas males living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived proximity of exercise facilities had a lower risk (coefficient = -1.00, 95% CI = -1.78 to -0.21). For females, there was no statistically significant association between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk. This study suggests that aspects of the neighborhood environment might be important for CVD morbidity and mortality in Japan, particularly among men.

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