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Notes from the Field: Cluster of Lymphogranuloma Venereum Cases Among Men Who Have Sex with Men – Michigan, August 2015-April 2016.

Notes from the Field: Cluster of Lymphogranuloma Venereum Cases Among Men Who Have Sex with Men – Michigan, August 2015-April 2016.
Author Information (click to view)

de Voux A, Kent JB, Macomber K, Krzanowski K, Jackson D, Starr T, Johnson S, Richmond D, Crane LR, Cohn J, Finch C, McFadden J, Pillay A, Chen C, Anderson L, Kersh EN,


de Voux A, Kent JB, Macomber K, Krzanowski K, Jackson D, Starr T, Johnson S, Richmond D, Crane LR, Cohn J, Finch C, McFadden J, Pillay A, Chen C, Anderson L, Kersh EN, (click to view)

de Voux A, Kent JB, Macomber K, Krzanowski K, Jackson D, Starr T, Johnson S, Richmond D, Crane LR, Cohn J, Finch C, McFadden J, Pillay A, Chen C, Anderson L, Kersh EN,

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MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report 2016 09 0265(34) 920-1 doi 10.15585/mmwr.mm6534a6

Abstract

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by infection with invasive Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L1-L3 (1). LGV is characterized by inguinal and/or femoral lymphadenopathy, typically following a transient, self-limited genital ulcer or papule that might go unnoticed. Rectal infection can result in proctocolitis that can present with mucoid and/or hemorrhagic rectal discharge, anal pain, constipation, fever, and tenesmus, and signs of granulomas and/or ulcerations on anoscopy (1,2). LGV can be an invasive, systemic infection, and if it is not treated early, LGV proctocolitis can lead to chronic colorectal fistulas and strictures (2). In Europe, outbreaks of LGV have been reported among men who have sex with men (MSM), often in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection (3-5). The prevalence of LGV in the United States is unknown (1), because diagnostic tests to differentiate LGV from non-LGV Chlamydia trachomatis are not widely available (6), and providers might not know that they should report cases that are presumptively treated.

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