CME – Pediatric Flexible Airway Endoscopy: New Standards

CME – Pediatric Flexible Airway Endoscopy: New Standards
Author Information (click to view)

Albert Faro, MD

Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine
Co-Director, Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics Development Center
Washington University
7 East Unit Based Joint Practice Team Physician Leader
Associate Medical Director, Respiratory Care Services
St. Louis Children’s Hospital

Albert Faro, MD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has no financial interests to disclose.

Figure 1 (click to view)
Figure 2 (click to view)
Target Audience (click to view)

This activity is designed to meet the needs of physicians.

Learning Objectives(click to view)

Upon completion of the educational activity, participants should be able to:

 

  1. Discuss key goals and recommendations from the American Thoracic Society’s 2015 update to their technical standards for performing flexible airway endoscopy.

Method of Participation(click to view)

Statements of credit will be awarded based on the participant reviewing monograph, correctly answer 2 out of 3 questions on the post test, completing and submitting an activity evaluation.  A statement of credit will be available upon completion of an online evaluation/claimed credit form at www.akhcme.com/pwNov6.  You must participate in the entire activity to receive credit.  If you have questions about this CME/CE activity, please contact AKH Inc. at dcotterman@akhcme.com.

Credit Available(click to view)

AKH

CME Credit Provided by AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare

Physicians
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare and Physician’s Weekly’s.  AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

AKH Inc., Advancing Knowledge in Healthcare designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Commercial Support(click to view)

There is no commercial support for this activity.

Disclosures(click to view)

It is the policy of AKH Inc. to ensure independence, balance, objectivity, scientific rigor, and integrity in all of its continuing education activities. The author must disclose to the participants any significant relationships with commercial interests whose products or devices may be mentioned in the activity or with the commercial supporter of this continuing education activity. Identified conflicts of interest are resolved by AKH prior to accreditation of the activity and may include any of or combination of the following: attestation to non-commercial content; notification of independent and certified CME/CE expectations; referral to National Author Initiative training; restriction of topic area or content; restriction to discussion of science only; amendment of content to eliminate discussion of device or technique; use of other author for discussion of recommendations; independent review against criteria ensuring evidence support recommendation; moderator review; and peer review.

Disclosure of Unlabeled Use & Investigational Product(click to view)

This educational activity may include discussion of uses of agents that are investigational and/or unapproved by the FDA. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer(click to view)

This course is designed solely to provide the healthcare professional with information to assist in his/her practice and professional development and is not to be considered a diagnostic tool to replace professional advice or treatment. The course serves as a general guide to the healthcare professional, and therefore, cannot be considered as giving legal, nursing, medical, or other professional advice in specific cases. AKH Inc. specifically disclaim responsibility for any adverse consequences resulting directly or indirectly from information in the course, for undetected error, or through participant’s misunderstanding of the content.

Faculty & Credentials(click to view)

FACULTY DISCLOSURES

Christopher Cole – Senior Editor
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers.
Albert Faro, MD
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers.
 
 AKH and PHYSICIAN WEEKLY’S STAFF/REVIEWERS

Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN- CE Director of Accreditation
Discloses no financial relationships with pharmaceutical or medical product manufacturers.

AKH planners and reviewers have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

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Albert Faro, MD (click to view)

Albert Faro, MD

Professor of Pediatrics
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine
Co-Director, Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics Development Center
Washington University
7 East Unit Based Joint Practice Team Physician Leader
Associate Medical Director, Respiratory Care Services
St. Louis Children’s Hospital

Albert Faro, MD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has no financial interests to disclose.

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The American Thoracic Society has released an update of technical standards that are endorsed for performing flexible airway endoscopy (FAE) in children. The standards address the equipment, personnel, competencies, and special procedures associated with FAE in children.
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Flexible airway endoscopy (FAE) is well accepted and widely used to manage children with known or suspected airway and lung disorders. “FAE is a powerful diagnostic tool that allows for direct visualization of the airway,” says Albert Faro, MD. “Dynamic airway problems can be evaluated, as can various congenital anomalies in the anatomy of the airway.”, FAE is also ideal for obtaining cultures from the lower airways to identify organisms that may be playing a role in a child’s decompensation so that these issues can be specifically addressed.

For children with certain airway and lung disorders, FAE can be used to provide therapy. For example, the mainstay of therapy for children with alveolar proteinosis is often repeated bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), explains Dr. Faro. “FAE can also be used to intubate children with difficult airways or to remove mucus plugs in those with atelectasis that is not improving and remains problematic or in plastic bronchitis,” he adds.

Questions on Pediatric Flexible Airway Endoscopy

Despite numerous uses (Table 1), nearly 2 decades have passed since technical standards were published on the performance of pediatric FAE. “The way FAE is performed and the instrumentation that’s available have changed over time,” Dr. Faro says. The American Thoracic Society convened an international, multidisciplinary committee to develop technical standards for the performance of pediatric FAE and develop its official statement on flexible endoscopy of the pediatric airway. The standards were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Pediatric Sedation During Flexible Airway Endoscopy

“One of the major goals of the standards was to address the use of sedation during FAE,” explains Dr. Faro, lead author of the document. “The level of sedation determines the quality of the FAE. When the last standards were published, pediatric pulmonologists provided their own sedation.”

Over the last 20 years, for the benefit of patients, anesthesiologists have become more involved with FAE, Dr. Faro says. “It has become fairly ubiquitous for anesthesiologists to use the laryngeal mask airway for FAEs, but this can distort the picture of the upper airway. Ideally, to see airway dynamics and assess the entire airway, FAE for airway evaluation should be performed on a spontaneously breathing patient through a natural airway. If FAE is used to sample the airway, perform BAL, or conduct a biopsy, the patient can then be provided with the airway that’s necessary to safely complete the procedure.”

Overall, the goals of sedation for FAE should provide patient comfort, maintain hemodynamic stability, maintain adequate gas exchange, and provide satisfactory conditions for therapeutic or diagnostic FAE, according to the standards. Collaboration between endoscopists and anesthesiologists is essential to optimizing anesthetic depth, airway management, and accurate diagnosis.

Airway Entry Techniques: Endotracheal Tube

The various airway entry techniques all have advantages and disadvantages, explains Dr. Faro (Table 2). “For example,” he says, “while a natural airway allows physicians to truly inspect the entire airway and assess airway dynamics, it is more difficult to monitor the patient’s gas exchange than with other approaches. An endotracheal tube allows for simple, fast access to the lower airway and provides a secure airway should the patient not tolerate the procedure. However, it doesn’t allow physicians to assess the upper airway, vocal cord motion, or airway dynamics.”

Bronchoscopic Training & Future Needs

The standards committee initiated a discussion regarding how to measure competency in bronchoscopic skills. “Traditionally, 50 procedures has been considered the minimum number of FAEs to perform in order to be considered able to perform the procedure alone,” explains Dr. Faro. “Clearly, that’s an inadequate way to assess competency.” The standards now recommend that a core set of demonstrable competencies be defined, including subsequent monitoring and documentation of trainee progress.

In developing the standards, Dr. Faro and colleagues performed a comprehensive literature search to better understand where gaps exist in knowledge and the types of studies that are needed to close these gaps. For example, the committee determined that further investigation is needed for optimizing the performance of BAL because few analyses have systematically studied it. The interpretation of certain markers found in BAL fluid also remains uncertain and requires future inquiry.

“The standards point out where there isn’t any evidence to support one approach over another,” says Dr. Faro. “It’s vital that we conduct more studies, specifically in children, so we can serve this patient population better.”

The technical standards are limited by a lack of controlled studies in the field. However, it is the hope of the writing committee that the current document provides a framework for how to perform pediatric FAE and stimulates further discussion, development, and research in the field.

Readings & Resources (click to view)

Faro A, Wood R, Schechter M, et al. Official American Thoracic Society technical standards: flexible airway endoscopy in children. Am J Resp Crit Care Med. 2015;191:1066-1080.
www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/rccm.201503-0474ST#.VVINUvlVhBd

Petersen B, Chennat J, Cohen J, et al. Multisociety guideline on reprocessing flexible GI endoscopes: 2011. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2011;32:527-537.

Midulla F, de Blic J, Barbato A, et al. Flexible endoscopy of paediatric airways. Eur Respir J. 2003;22:698-708.

Leong A, Green C, Kurland G, Wood R. A survey of training in pediatric flexible bronchoscopy. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014;49:605-610.

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