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Prevalence of Severe Joint Pain Among Adults with Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis – United States, 2002-2014.

Prevalence of Severe Joint Pain Among Adults with Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis – United States, 2002-2014.
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Barbour KE, Boring M, Helmick CG, Murphy LB, Qin J,


Barbour KE, Boring M, Helmick CG, Murphy LB, Qin J, (click to view)

Barbour KE, Boring M, Helmick CG, Murphy LB, Qin J,

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MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report 2016 Oct 0765(39) 1052-1056 doi 10.15585/mmwr.mm6539a2
Abstract

In the United States, arthritis is a leading cause of disability (1,2); arthritis affected an estimated 52.5 million (22.7%) adults in 2010-2012 and has been projected to affect 78.4 million adults by 2040 (3). Severe joint pain (SJP) can limit function and seriously compromise quality of life (4,5). To determine the prevalence of SJP among adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and the trend in SJP from 2002 to 2014, CDC analyzed data from the National Health Interview Survey. In 2014, approximately one fourth of adults with arthritis had SJP (27.2%). Within selected groups, the age-standardized prevalence of SJP was higher among women (29.2%), non-Hispanic blacks (42.3%), Hispanics (35.8%), and persons with a disability (45.6%), and those who were unable to work (51.9%); prevalence also was higher among those who had fair or poor health (49.1%), obesity (31.7%), heart disease (34.1%), diabetes (40.9%), or serious psychological distress (56.3%). From 2002 to 2014, the age-standardized prevalence of SJP among adults with arthritis did not change (p = 0.14); however, the number of adults with SJP was significantly higher in 2014 (14.6 million) than in 2002 (10.5 million). A strategy to improve pain management (e.g., the 2016 National Pain Strategy*) has been developed, and more widespread dissemination of evidence-based interventions that reduce joint pain in adults with arthritis might reduce the prevalence of SJP.

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