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Primary Care Screening Methods and Outcomes for Asylum Seekers in New York City.

Primary Care Screening Methods and Outcomes for Asylum Seekers in New York City.
Author Information (click to view)

Bertelsen NS, Selden E, Krass P, Keatley ES, Keller A,


Bertelsen NS, Selden E, Krass P, Keatley ES, Keller A, (click to view)

Bertelsen NS, Selden E, Krass P, Keatley ES, Keller A,

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Journal of immigrant and minority health 2016 Oct 4()

Abstract

Effective screening in primary care among asylum-seekers in the US is critical as this population grows. This study aimed to evaluate disease prevalence and screening methods in this high-risk group. Two hundred ten new clients from 51 countries, plus Tibet, who were accepted into a program for asylum seekers from 2012 to 2014 were included. Screening rates and outcomes for infectious, non-communicable, and mental illnesses were evaluated. Screening rates were highest for PTSD, depression, hepatitis B, and latent tuberculosis. Seventy-one percent of clients screened positive for depression and 55 % for PTSD, followed by latent tuberculosis (41 %), hypertension (10 %), hepatitis B (9.4 %), and HIV (0.8 %). Overall screening rates were high. Point of care testing was more effective than testing that required a repeat visit. A large psychiatric and infectious disease burden was identified. These findings can inform future primary care screening efforts for asylum seekers in the US.

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