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Rotavirus vaccine strain transmission by vaccinated infants in the foster home.

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Miura H, Kawamura Y, Sugata K, Koshiyama N, Yoshikawa A, Komoto S, Taniguchi K, Ihira M, Yoshikawa T,


Miura H, Kawamura Y, Sugata K, Koshiyama N, Yoshikawa A, Komoto S, Taniguchi K, Ihira M, Yoshikawa T, (click to view)

Miura H, Kawamura Y, Sugata K, Koshiyama N, Yoshikawa A, Komoto S, Taniguchi K, Ihira M, Yoshikawa T,

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Journal of medical virology 2016 6 23() doi 10.1002/jmv.24613

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated the transmission of rotavirus vaccine strains from vaccinated children to nonvaccinated siblings. We sought to fully elucidate the safety of rotavirus (RV) vaccination in closed contact circumstance such as the foster home for future assessment of the vaccine safety in an neonatal intensive care unit. Stool samples were collected from four RV vaccinated (160 samples) and 23 unvaccinated (766 samples) infants. RV viral RNA loads were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RV vaccine strain RNA was persistently detected in stool samples collected from the four vaccine recipients and one unvaccinated infant, but not in the stool samples collected from the 22 other unvaccinated infants. The unvaccinated infant who tested positive for the RV vaccine strain was vaccinated prior to enrollment in this study. The quantitative real-time RT-PCR data revealed a peak viral RNA load one week after vaccination followed by a gradual decrease. The current study suggests that RV vaccination may be safe in a close contact environment because there was limited transmission from RV vaccinated to unvaccinated infants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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