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American Diabetes Association’s 6th Disparities Partnership Forum

American Diabetes Association’s 6th Disparities Partnership Forum

The American Diabetes Association will be holding its 6th Disparities Partnership Forum entitled, Overcoming Diabetes: Diabetes Care in High Risk Populations, October 21-22, 2013, in Arlington Virginia. This year’s forum will focus on cultural competency, health equity, and health literacy as it relates to healthcare and social determinants of health. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from Hispanic/Latino, African American, Asian American, Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native thought leaders and practitioners. The overall learning objectives are to establish evidence-based expert opinion on what is known and not known about social determinants of health and what additional community work is needed. Upon completion of this activity, the participants will be able to: Explore collaborative methods to improve diabetes care in high risk populations by addressing cultural competency, health literacy and health equity. Discuss the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetes in high risk populations. Identify successful practices that address the need for cultural competency, health equity and health literacy to provide quality diabetes care. Identify key elements of coalition-building at the community level to improve the quality of diabetes care in high risk communities. Registration ends on September 27th!  Click here to view or download the...
November is American Diabetes Month®

November is American Diabetes Month®

The American Diabetes Association sponsors the annual American Diabetes Month as part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to raising awareness of the disease. According to the ADA, nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes; another 79 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Month website holds a wealth of information about the disease, including a risk test, a list of symptoms for all three types of diabetes, recipes and meal planners. Patients and caregivers can also contact the ADA hotline at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or click on the “chat with us” icon at diabetes.org weekdays from 8:30 am to 8:30 pm. Questions can also be e-mailed in English to askADA@diabetes.org or in Spanish to preguntas@diabetes.org This year, the ADA has also teamed up with CVS/pharmacy and for every photo/image uploaded to the ADA Facebook page that demonstrates the meaning of living with diabetes, CVS will donate $1 to the American Diabetes Association, up to $25,000. Diabetes Coverage on physiciansweekly.com In recognition of American Diabetes Month, yesterday we delivered the first in a series of four specialty e-newsletters containing links to a month’s worth of feature articles on the disease, some of which were completed in cooperation with the experts at the American Diabetes Association. Upcoming articles include “Addressing Common Comorbidities in Diabetes,” “New Guidelines for Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes,” “Driving and Diabetes” and “Transitioning From Pediatric to Adult Diabetes Care Systems.” You can also view, download, or print our new Diabetes Update eBook. If you are already registered to receive the Physician’s Weekly e-newsletter, you will automatically receive all four diabetes specialty issues in addition to our regular weekly issue...
A New Program for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

A New Program for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

Every 17 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. More than 26 million Americans have diabetes, and about 90% of cases are type 2. Data from the CDC estimate that 1.9 million Americans were diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 (Figure). Many patients who are newly diagnosed with diabetes may be distressed after receiving the news. They may fear the worst about the treatments and lifestyle changes that lie ahead. Others may choose to ignore the disease or fail to grasp the severity of the situation. They may leave their doctor’s office with a poor understanding of what is required of them to get their diabetes under control so they can avoid serious complications, such as heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, amputation, and even death. A Critical Moment “It can be challenging for healthcare providers to get patients to understand the seriousness of their disease at the time of diagnosis,” says Vivian A. Fonseca, MD. Healthcare providers play a vital role in clearing up any confusion patients may have about their diagnosis. However, it can be difficult to inform patients about all the key components of managing their disease. Prescription drugs and lifestyle changes are required. Informing patients about why they need specific treatments is important, but key messages can be lost because of the psychological impact of being newly diagnosed. Assemble the Team “The dialogue between physicians and patients is important,” adds Dr. Fonseca. “Providers need to be open and honest with their patients and take the extra time that may be needed to address inquiries. At diagnosis, it’s...

A Web-Based Depression Treatment

A web-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) depression treatment appears to be effective in reducing depressive symptoms in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to a study from the Netherlands. In a randomized controlled trial, researchers found that web-based CBT effectively reduced depressive symptoms by intention-to-treat analyses and by per-protocol analyses. The intervention reduced diabetes-specific emotional distress, but had no beneficial effect on glycemic...
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