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Conference Highlights: AHS 2016

Conference Highlights: AHS 2016

Gender Differences in Migraine Prior research has indicated that migraine is more common in women than in men. To further understand gender differences in migraine, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine examined the determinants and burden of migraine in men and whether disease presentation differed by gender. Men with migraine reported fewer headache days per month but were less likely than women to report seeing a physician to manager their headaches. Men who were consulting a physician were less likely than women to receive a migraine diagnosis and to report using prescription medications for headaches. —————————————————————-   Migraine Undertreated in Obese Women Previous studies examining acute medication use patterns among migraineurs have been limited to retrospective measures, recall bias, and ecological validity. Using innovative smartphone-based Ecological Momentary Assessment—which provides rich, detailed data—study investigators evaluated acute medication use patterns on a per-headache basis over 28 consecutive days in obese women with migraine via a smartphone diary. On average, 43% of headaches went untreated among the participants. NSAIDs were most frequently used as monotherapy. However, the majority of women used more than one medication class to treat their headaches during the 28 days. —————————————————————-   Headaches Persist After TBI Headache is among the most frequently reported symptoms following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in previous investigations. However, little is known regarding the long-term persistence of these headaches. For a study, the symptoms of 300 patients with mostly moderate to severe TBIs who were admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation facility were recorded 3, 6, 12, and 60 months after their injuries. A high prevalence of new or worse headaches was observed...
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