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Identifying Predictors of Osteoarthritis

Identifying Predictors of Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a significant health problem, with studies suggesting that the condition affects up to 10% of men and 18% of women over the age of 60. Previous research has suggested that some physical risk factors may be associated with a higher rate of early onset OA. “There is an increasing need to address joint damage and its relationship to injuries, participation in sports, being physically active, being overweight or obese, and occupational activity so that we can better inform patients on strategies to prevent OA,” says Sarah A. Richmond, CEP, MSc, PhD. “This information can also help clinicians address the rising healthcare burden associated with OA.” New Data In the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Dr. Richmond and colleagues published a systematic review and meta-analysis that addressed this issue. According to the results, there was an increased risk for either knee or hip OA in individuals with previous joint injuries, those who were overweight or obese, and those who had physically demanding occupations, especially jobs that involved squatting or kneeling activities. Some findings, however, remain inconclusive, including levels of physical activity and sport-specificity in individuals who did not suffer an injury.   “Overall, joint injury was a significant risk factor for knee OA, with individuals who had suffered a previous knee injury at a three- to eight-fold greater risk of OA than individuals with no history of injury,” Dr. Richmond says. Joint injury was also a risk factor for hip OA, as was previous meniscectomy with or without ACL injury. Important Implications Dr. Richmond notes that a clear understanding of the implications of the risk...
Guidelines for Managing Gout

Guidelines for Managing Gout

The incidence of physician-diagnosed gout has risen over the past 20 years and now affects about 8.3 million adults in the United States. Uric acid excess has been identified as the key contributor to gout. When hyperuricemia develops, crystals containing the salt of uric acid can form and deposit in joints, causing pain and swelling that can be debilitating for patients and adversely affect quality of life. Published research has indicated that gout may be attributed to excess uric acid promoted by several comorbidities, including hypertension, obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and extensive treatment with thiazide and loop diuretics for cardiovascular disease. Important New Guidelines on Gout To improve patient care, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published evidence-based guidelines for managing gout in Arthritis Care & Research. A U.S. expert task force was convened to develop two guidelines, the first focusing on systematic non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapeutic approaches to hyperuricemia, and the second covering therapies and prophylactic anti-inflammatory treatments for acute gouty arthritis. The guidelines provide recommendations based on medical literature spanning from the 1950s to the present. “These guidelines promote greater awareness of the need for urate control and the increasing burden and prevalence of gout,” says Robert A. Terkeltaub, MD, who was senior author on both ACR guidelines. “The intent is to educate physicians on effective ways to prevent gout attacks and provide them with recommendations for using therapies and diet and lifestyle measures for long-term care.” Hyperuricemia According to the guidelines, initial measures for treating gout should include patient education about the role of uric acid in the disease and non-pharmacologic approaches. “Patients should...
Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes

Assessing Arthritis in People With Diabetes

Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States and is a barrier to physical activity. Recent research has suggested that arthritis may also increase the risk of diabetes. Some medications for treating arthritis can also decrease insulin sensitivity, thereby increasing diabetes risk. Physical activity is an important component of both diabetes and arthritis prevention and management. Gaining a Better Understanding of Arthritis Impact In a study published in Diabetes Care, my colleagues and I examined cross-sectional data from the National Health Interview Survey. We wanted to gain a better understanding of the burden and impact of arthritis among older adults with diabetes. By learning more about how these disease states are intertwined, clinicians can make informed decisions when selecting interventions so that they’re utilized appropriately. This data may also help with advancing policy and guidelines to ensure better delivery of healthcare.   According to our results, almost 50% of people with diabetes have arthritis and about 25% have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL). For people without diabetes, about 20% have arthritis and about 8% have AAAL. Our findings further support that arthritis among adults with diabetes significantly limits physical activity. Many are unable to realize the benefits of physical activity in managing their diabetes and preventing diabetes-related complications. The Effect of Arthritis on Diabetes Management Although it has already been established that arthritis is common among adults, our analysis sheds light on the effect of arthritis on physical activity limitation among those with both conditions. We hope our research will help clinicians and patients become aware that arthritis is a substantial barrier to physical activity and that...
Newsworthy Research from 2012 ACR/ARHP

Newsworthy Research from 2012 ACR/ARHP

More than 20 rheumatology studies were selected as newsworthy and highlighted during the 2012 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting.  ACR/ARHP 2012 Headlines Bone medication may save osteoarthritis knees. According to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., a daily dose of strontium ranelate — a medication prescribed for osteoporosis — may delay knee osteoarthritis progression. The study also revealed that taking strontium ranelate may improve knee pain, reduce joint damage and the need for surgery. View press release. Mobile calls from doctor can place rheumatoid arthritis on hold. Mobile phone monitoring in people with rheumatoid arthritis increases the likelihood that people with the disease will follow treatment, according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. View press release. Extra weight linked to rheumatoid arthritis risk in women. Being overweight is linked to a higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. View press release. Other research from the meeting includes fibromyalgia and the brain, depression a risk factor for mortality in rheumatoid arthritis in men, antibodies signaling CVD, and much more! View all 2012 Annual Meeting Press Releases Additional Resources ACR in the News:  Click here to visit the ACR newsroom. Rheumatology Images Available for Media Explore over 1,500 images of rheumatic diseases ranging from common conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis to rare conditions including multicentric reticulohistiocytosis. Download and collect scholarly images for professional development, rheumatic research and educational presentations. Click here....
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