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Conference Highlights: ASH 2016

Conference Highlights: ASH 2016

Hypertension Linked With Nocturia Previous research has linked nocturia with hypertension and African-American race or ethnicity. However, these studies have not historically included actual measurements of blood pressure (BP), instead using BP numbers from electronic health records or self-reports. For a new analysis, more than 2,000 African-American men aged 35 to 79 were screened for hypertension with repeated oscillometric BP measurement on a single occasion. Participants also completed questionnaires that asked about nocturia and key known determinants. Nocturia was reported by 85% of study participants with hypertension, compared with a rate of 69% for those without hypertension. Men with uncontrolled hypertension despite treatment with antihypertensive agents had a nocturia rate of 91%. This rate was 96% for those with a systolic BP of 160 mm Hg or higher despite antihypertensive treatment. ————————————————————–   The Cost-Effectiveness of Aggressive BP Targets Experts have hypothesized that a systolic blood pressure (BP) target of less than 120 mm Hg for patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events may help prevent future cardiac events. However, cost-effectiveness studies to confirm these suspicions have been lacking. American investigators analyzed the effect of lowering BP targets to 120 mm Hg with regard to cost-effectiveness for patients aged 50 and older with CVD or chronic kidney disease or 10-year American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology pooled cohorts CVD risk of 15% or greater. The authors estimated that using this target BP threshold would prevent an additional 35,000 CVD events nationally if it were added to existing JNC7 criteria. The research team also estimated that this strategy would have annual healthcare cost savings of $1.22 billion for...
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