Advertisement
ASM Microbe 2016: Conference Highlights

ASM Microbe 2016: Conference Highlights

Highlights from ASM Microbe 2016 include PrEP use and racial disparities, new bacteria causing Lyme Disease, and more! Below are highlights from the inaugural meeting that combined the American Society for Microbiology’s general meeting and the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Improving MRSA Care Previous research has shown that screening patients for MRSA on admission to the ICU can help reduce transmission rates when compared with no screening. However, studies have also shown that most patients with MRSA are treated outside the ICU. In 2005, a hospital system began using polymerase chain reaction tests to screen all incoming patients for MRSA. Patients who screened positive for MRSA were identified as colonized in their medical records, placed in gown and glove isolation, and decolonized. The rate of MRSA in the hospital decreased from 8.9 cases per 10,000 patient-days prior to universal screening to 3.9 cases per 10,000 patients at 18 months after initiating universal screening. After comparing the use of decolonization with no decolonization, the authors observed no differences in MRSA rates. After using an electronic protocol to identify patients at high risk for MRSA carriage, the hospital system was able to capture 90% of carriers while only testing 50% of admissions. Bacteria on Gloves & Plastic Surfaces Clinical investigations have yet to define the number and types of common bacteria that can be transmitted from contaminated examination gloves to hospital surfaces. For a study, researchers inoculated examination gloves with bacteria that are commonly found in healthcare-associated infections, including multidrug-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, A baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Contaminated gloves were touched to a sterilized polypropylene surface immediately...
[ HIDE/SHOW ]