CME/CE: Bariatric Surgery & Mental Health

CME/CE: Bariatric Surgery & Mental Health

Bariatric surgery is recognized as a viable option to promote weight loss and to treat obesity-related comorbidities among the severely obese. “While bariatric surgery is increasingly being used with some success, less attention has been paid to the mental health of patients with obesity and how this may influence the outcomes of patients who undergo these types of procedures,” explains Aaron J. Dawes, MD. Studies estimate that about one in five Americans has a mental health condition, including about 8% who are depressed, and another 1% to 5% who have a binge eating disorder. Previous research has suggested that these conditions may be more common among bariatric surgery patients, but no good estimates exist to suggest how common. To address this research gap, Dr. Dawes and colleagues performed a systematic review, which was published in JAMA, to examine the prevalence of mental health conditions in patients seeking and undergoing bariatric surgery. The analysis also evaluated two important connections between surgery and mental health. First, the researchers explored if preoperative mental health conditions were associated with differences in weight loss after surgery. Second, they examined if surgery was associated with changes in the clinical course of mental health conditions.   Taking a Closer Look For the study, investigators searched trusted resources for studies published between January 1988 and November 2015 using terms like bariatric and obesity as well as the names of obesity surgery procedures, psychiatric disorders, and eating disorders. After screening nearly 2,300 articles, the authors identified 68 publications that met their inclusion criteria: 59 reported on the prevalence of preoperative mental health conditions (involving 65,363 patients) and 27...
Bariatric Surgery & Mental Health

Bariatric Surgery & Mental Health

Bariatric surgery is recognized as a viable option to promote weight loss and to treat obesity-related comorbidities among the severely obese. “While bariatric surgery is increasingly being used with some success, less attention has been paid to the mental health of patients with obesity and how this may influence the outcomes of patients who undergo these types of procedures,” explains Aaron J. Dawes, MD. Studies estimate that about one in five Americans has a mental health condition, including about 8% who are depressed, and another 1% to 5% who have a binge eating disorder. Previous research has suggested that these conditions may be more common among bariatric surgery patients, but no good estimates exist to suggest how common. To address this research gap, Dr. Dawes and colleagues performed a systematic review, which was published in JAMA, to examine the prevalence of mental health conditions in patients seeking and undergoing bariatric surgery. The analysis also evaluated two important connections between surgery and mental health. First, the researchers explored if preoperative mental health conditions were associated with differences in weight loss after surgery. Second, they examined if surgery was associated with changes in the clinical course of mental health conditions.   Taking a Closer Look For the study, investigators searched trusted resources for studies published between January 1988 and November 2015 using terms like bariatric and obesity as well as the names of obesity surgery procedures, psychiatric disorders, and eating disorders. After screening nearly 2,300 articles, the authors identified 68 publications that met their inclusion criteria: 59 reported on the prevalence of preoperative mental health conditions (involving 65,363 patients) and 27...