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Cholesterol & Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Cholesterol & Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Published research suggests that cholesterol levels commonly rise as people age and then decrease later in life. “Abnormal lipids are important risk factors that play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD),” says Xuemei Sui, MD, MPH, PhD. “Therefore, identifying modifiable risk factors that can affect lipid profiles might help reduce the burden of CVD.” Some previous analyses have explored the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on changes in blood glucose and blood pressure and have shown beneficial changes with higher CRF levels. However, few studies have looked at the effect of CRF on age-related longitudinal changes of lipids and lipoproteins. “With the high percentage of sedentary people living in the United States, it is particularly important to understand the specific benefits of exercise and fitness and the roles they play in health,” says Dr. Sui. New Data In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Dr. Sui and colleagues used data from health exams performed during the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. The long-term study ran from 1970 to 2006 and included more than 11,400 men between the ages of 20 and 90. Patients did not have known high cholesterol, high triglycerides, CVD, and cancer at baseline. Each participant took a treadmill exercise test to determine their baseline CRF level and had their total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol levels recorded. Important Findings Men with lower CRF levels had a greater risk of developing high cholesterol in their early 30s, according to the results. Men with higher levels of CRF did not develop high cholesterol develop until...
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