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Clinical Questions at the Point of Care

Clinical Questions at the Point of Care

Since the 1980s, studies have shown that clinicians frequently raise questions during patient encounters in all healthcare settings. These studies have suggested that although questions arise frequently, they often go unanswered. “Unanswered questions should be seen as an opportunity to improve outcomes by filling gaps in medical knowledge,” says Guilherme Del Fiol, MD, PhD. He adds that understanding clinicians’ questions is essential to guiding the design of interventions that aim to provide the right information at the right time. According to Dr. Del Fiol, there are challenges associated with maintaining current knowledge in medicine. “Several factors can come into play,” he says. “Science is continuing to expand medical knowledge, but this can make it increasingly complex to appropriately deliver healthcare. In addition, the aging population continues to grow, a phenomenon that further complicates how easily clinicians can address more difficult questions at the point of care.” No systematic reviews have been available on the clinical questions raised by clinicians in the context of patient care and decision making. A Systematic Review on Clinical Questions Dr. Del Fiol and colleagues recently conducted a systematic review of the literature on clinicians’ questions. Published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the research focused on the need for general medical knowledge that could be obtained from books, journals, specialists, and online resources. The systematic review took into account the frequency by which clinicians raised clinical questions, how often these questions were pursued and how often answers were successfully found, and the types of questions that were typically asked. They also sought to determine overriding themes and the potential effects of information seeking on clinicians’ decision...
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