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Live Meetings Sway MDs to Screen for HSDD

Live Meetings Sway MDs to Screen for HSDD

After a series of live continuing medical education (CME) activities on female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), primary care clinicians who previously did not screen for the disorder indicated they would incorporate such screening into their practices, according to a new study from Pri-Med. Prior to the activities, 41% of primary care clinicians did not screen for sexual dysfunction in female patients, and almost 75% reported they “sometimes/rarely/never” assessed their sexual health. However, following the activity, 61% of clinicians indicated they planned to regularly assess sexual health in their female patients, and 63% of clinicians reported they would incorporate open-ended patient questioning about sexual health into their practice. Pri-Med, a leading provider of professional medical education solutions to a community of more than 248,000 U.S.-based primary care clinicians, announced the study findings at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology 59th Annual Clinical Meeting, held April 30-May 4, 2011 in Washington, D.C. The live activities utilized a blend of multimedia delivery formats, including patient-physician video scenarios and interactive audience polling, to address the clinical care gaps. More than 3,100 clinicians participated in the activities in five major U.S. cities. The education intervention was sponsored and administered by pmiCME, LLC, Pri-Med’s accredited provider of education for medical, pharmacy, and nursing professionals. The content was created in collaboration with Athena Education Group, LLC, a recognized medical education company with expertise educating on women’s health issues. HSDD is an underrecognized and undertreated condition that is often overlooked by HCPs. (Frank 2008)  Women with HSDD currently receive inadequate health care in part because training in sexual medicine is absent and inadequate in most medical schools. ...
Doctors Unwilling to Pay for Unbiased CME

Doctors Unwilling to Pay for Unbiased CME

Although most doctors feel that funding from the healthcare industry may bias continuing medical education (CME), a report published this week found that they don’t appear to be willing to pay for impartial information. According to the report in the Archives of Internal Medicine, U.S. physicians spend an estimated $1,400 on CME each year. Without contributions from pharmaceutical and medical device companies — which cover up to 60% of CME costs in the United States — that amount would increase to $3,500 a year. A survey of nearly 1,400 participants at five live CME activities sought to determine the impact of commercial support on bias and physician willingness to pay additional amounts to replace commercial support. Of the 770 respondents: 88% believed that commercial support of CME activities introduces bias. 15% supported elimination of commercial support. 42% were willing to pay increased registration fees to decrease or eliminate commercial support. Most physicians did not want to see commercial support eliminated and, thus, have to pay more for unbiased education. Researchers surmise that while physicians may feel that bias exists, it is limited—or they feel they are immune to it. Does extra out-of-pocket money outweigh concerns about impartial medical...
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