CME: Coronary Heart Disease: Stagnation in Young Adults & Women

CME: Coronary Heart Disease: Stagnation in Young Adults & Women

Recent reports have shown that coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of death among Americans despite a remarkable decline in cardiovascular deaths related to the disease over the past several decades. CHD mortality rates fell by as much as 52% in men and 49% in women between 1980 and 2002, according to some research. However, other data suggests that these beneficial trends may not have been experienced by all demographic groups. “A 2007 study showed that there was a dramatic slowing in the average annual rate of decline of CHD mortality among adults aged 35 to 54,” explains Viola Vaccarino, MD, PhD. “Younger women appeared to be a particularly vulnerable patient group in this analysis.”   Examining Long-Term Trends For a study published in Circulation, Dr. Vaccarino and colleagues examined CHD mortality rates in the United States by age and sex from 1979 to 2011. “It’s important to assess long-term trends in CHD mortality to monitor our progress and see if more work is needed,” says Dr. Vaccarino.  The study group calculated age-specific CHD mortality rates and compared estimated annual percentage changes (EAPC) during three approximate decades of data: 1979–1989, 1990–1999, and 2000–2011. The authors then used regression modeling to assess EAPC trends over time. According to the results, the EAPC from 1979 to 2011 was lower in people younger than 55 years of age than in older groups in the two most recent decades. In contrast, CHD mortality rates declined steeply after 2000 for both women and men who were aged 65 and older.   Younger Women at Particular Risk The study also revealed...
Coronary Heart Disease: Stagnation in Young Adults & Women

Coronary Heart Disease: Stagnation in Young Adults & Women

Recent reports have shown that coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of death among Americans despite a remarkable decline in cardiovascular deaths related to the disease over the past several decades. CHD mortality rates fell by as much as 52% in men and 49% in women between 1980 and 2002, according to some research. However, other data suggests that these beneficial trends may not have been experienced by all demographic groups. “A 2007 study showed that there was a dramatic slowing in the average annual rate of decline of CHD mortality among adults aged 35 to 54,” explains Viola Vaccarino, MD, PhD. “Younger women appeared to be a particularly vulnerable patient group in this analysis.”   Examining Long-Term Trends For a study published in Circulation, Dr. Vaccarino and colleagues examined CHD mortality rates in the United States by age and sex from 1979 to 2011. “It’s important to assess long-term trends in CHD mortality to monitor our progress and see if more work is needed,” says Dr. Vaccarino.  The study group calculated age-specific CHD mortality rates and compared estimated annual percentage changes (EAPC) during three approximate decades of data: 1979–1989, 1990–1999, and 2000–2011. The authors then used regression modeling to assess EAPC trends over time. According to the results, the EAPC from 1979 to 2011 was lower in people younger than 55 years of age than in older groups in the two most recent decades. In contrast, CHD mortality rates declined steeply after 2000 for both women and men who were aged 65 and older.   Younger Women at Particular Risk The study also revealed...