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CME: Updated Guidelines for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk

CME: Updated Guidelines for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) caused by atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of death and is a major cause of disability as well as a significant source of healthcare costs in the United States. In 2013, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released an updated clinical practice guideline to help clinicians better identify adults who may be at high risk for developing atherosclerotic CVD. The update, published jointly in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Circulation, also provides recommendations for identifying patients who could benefit from lifestyle changes or drug therapy to help prevent CVD. “These guidelines were last updated about 10 years ago,” says David C. Goff, Jr., MD, PhD, who co-chaired the ACC/AHA risk assessment guideline writing group. “Since that time, we have collected a large amount of research that has further enhanced our understanding of how best to care for these patients and improve our approaches to determining who should get specific types of preventive treatments.” Risk Assessment A key goal of the ACC/AHA guideline is to ensure that preventive treatments—especially lifestyle changes and drug treatment—are used in those who are most likely to benefit from them. To do this, the guideline includes high-quality risk assessment methods that use risk factors that are known to lead to atherosclerosis (Table 1). Factors such as age, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes can be easily collected by clinicians and then integrated into a risk score to guide care and prompt discussions with patients.   “The vast majority of heart attacks and strokes could be prevented if patients knew...
Updated Guidelines for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk

Updated Guidelines for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) caused by atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of death and is a major cause of disability as well as a significant source of healthcare costs in the United States. In 2013, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) released an updated clinical practice guideline to help clinicians better identify adults who may be at high risk for developing atherosclerotic CVD. The update, published jointly in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Circulation, also provides recommendations for identifying patients who could benefit from lifestyle changes or drug therapy to help prevent CVD. “These guidelines were last updated about 10 years ago,” says David C. Goff, Jr., MD, PhD, who co-chaired the ACC/AHA risk assessment guideline writing group. “Since that time, we have collected a large amount of research that has further enhanced our understanding of how best to care for these patients and improve our approaches to determining who should get specific types of preventive treatments.” Risk Assessment A key goal of the ACC/AHA guideline is to ensure that preventive treatments—especially lifestyle changes and drug treatment—are used in those who are most likely to benefit from them. To do this, the guideline includes high-quality risk assessment methods that use risk factors that are known to lead to atherosclerosis (Table 1). Factors such as age, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, smoking, and diabetes can be easily collected by clinicians and then integrated into a risk score to guide care and prompt discussions with patients.   “The vast majority of heart attacks and strokes could be prevented if patients knew...
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