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Vitamin K Deficiency & Risk of Knee Osteoarthritis

Vitamin K Deficiency & Risk of Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis affecting older adults in the United States. OA commonly affects the knee joint and leads to pain and lower limb functional limitations. Knee OA is the leading cause of lower extremity disability among older adults in the U.S. As the population is aging, the prevalence of knee OA is expected to increase substantially. Currently, there are few therapeutic options available to treat symptoms of knee OA. Many of the pharmacologic therapies used to treat the condition are associated with side effects and have limited efficacy. Importantly, none of the treatments available at this time can prevent or halt the progression of knee OA. Thus, there is a crucial need to develop safe and effective therapeutic and prophylactic agents for knee OA. Vitamin K’s Role In clinical research, vitamin K has been identified as a potential target of interest in the care of patients with knee OA and in those at risk for it. “Vitamin K plays an important role in regulating bone and cartilage mineralization,” explains Devyani Misra, MD, MS. She adds that many older adults in America suffer from low vitamin K intake and subclinical deficiency, according to published research. Subclinical deficiency refers to the detection of a low serum vitamin K level without signs of bleeding. “Some prior studies have shown an association of low vitamin K status, as assessed by biochemical measures and dietary intake, with prevalent radiographic OA,” Dr. Misra says. “However, none of these analyses have evaluated the association of vitamin K deficiency with incident (new-onset) radiographic OA. They also haven’t evaluated the structural components within...
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