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Guideline Recommendations for Prosthetic Joint Infections

Guideline Recommendations for Prosthetic Joint Infections

Research shows that as many as 20,000 of the nearly 1 million total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures performed in the United States result in a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) over the lifetime of the device. PJIs remain one of the most serious complications of prosthetic joint implantation. According to recent estimates, roughly 4 million THAs and TKAs will be performed each year in the U.S. by 2030, due largely to the rapidly increasing elderly population. Diagnosing PJIs is often challenging for physicians and frequently necessitates multiple modalities. Management of these infections typically requires surgical interventions and lengthy courses of intravenous (IV) and oral antibiotics. Although much research has been conducted in this area, questions about optimal diagnosis and management strategies for PJIs remain. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recently released updated guidelines that are intended to help clinicians by offering optimal strategies to improve the diagnosis and management of these infections. Using a Team Approach A key point that the IDSA guidelines emphasize is that using a multidisciplinary team approach is essential for managing PJIs. “A strong collaboration is required from all medical specialists who are involved in the care of patients with PJIs,” explains Douglas R. Osmon, MD, who served as lead author of the IDSA guidelines. “This team most often includes an orthopedist and an infectious diseases specialist. Other specialists should be involved on a case-by-case basis, such as plastic surgeons, general internists, nurses, mid-level providers, and microbiologists.”   Patients requiring THA or TKA procedures tend to be elderly, meaning they are more likely than others to have multiple comorbidities,...
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