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Detecting and Managing Preeclampsia

Detecting and Managing Preeclampsia

As one of the leading causes of maternal mortality worldwide, pre-eclampsia does not distinguish between social status, and its causes are poorly understood. Hypertension higher than 140 mmHg systolic and 90 mmHg diastolic that occurs after the 20-week gestational period and ends post-partum is pregnancy induced. In the U.S., pre-eclampsia and eclampsia are responsible for over 17% of maternal deaths. Patients with pre-eclampsia present with proteinuria, visual disturbances, headaches, and edema. From the point of diagnosis, careful monitoring and management are required to preserve the health of the mother and fetus. As a condition that may be caused by the trophoblastic invasion of the spiral arterioles at the site of the placenta, pre-eclampsia can hinder fetal development. The mother is at risk of grandmal seizures, general organ malfunction due to impaired circulation, and severe neurological manifestations. The severity of this condition means that those working with pregnant women at a primary and secondary care level need to play a role in monitoring its emergence and managing it if it does occur. The Latest ACOG Guidelines on Diagnosing Pre-eclampsia The Committee on Practice Bulletins–Obstetrics of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) has developed a practice bulletin on the diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. While Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) is present when a woman’s blood pressure rises above 140/90 mmHg after the 20-week period, there are stricter criteria for diagnosing severe pre-eclampsia that require careful monitoring. Systolic blood pressure of 160 mmHg or higher on one occasion or diastolic blood pressure of 110 mmHg or higher on two or more occasions can lead to a pre-eclampsia diagnosis. Proteinuria of 5g or higher in...
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