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Dating Violence Among Adolescent ED Visits

Dating Violence Among Adolescent ED Visits

Adolescent and young adult dating violence, which encompasses both victimization and aggression, is a significant public health concern. Some studies estimate that as many as 10% of high school students have experienced dating victimization and nearly 20% have reported physical violence toward a dating partner. “While intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a significant problem among adults, little is known about this violence and aggression in adolescent and young adult populations,” says Vijay Singh, MD, MPH, MS. The Joint Commission mandates that clinicians screen patients for IPV in all healthcare settings, including the ED. The United States Preventive Service Task Force also recently recommended that asymptomatic women aged 14 to 46 be screened for IPV and provided intervention services. “Despite these initiatives, only 30% of adolescents report ever being asked by a healthcare provider about dating violence,” says Dr. Singh. “Simply treating injuries and not assessing for dating violence means we can miss opportunities to prevent these problems in the future and break the cycle of violence.” It is important to examine dating victimization and aggression among both sexes because dating violence is common in both men and women, according to Dr. Singh. “Assessment of both dating victimization and aggression is lacking in the literature,” he says. “Dating violence is different from adult IPV in that relationship roles are not yet set. Many adolescent couples aren’t living together and there is a tendency for them to change partners more often than adults.” Patterns that begin in adolescence can carry over to adulthood, including IPV. Assessing Trends of Adolescent Violence In the Annals of Emergency Medicine, Dr. Singh...
ISC 2015

ISC 2015

ISC 2015 New research was presented at ISC 2015, the annual International Stroke Conference, from February 11 to 13 in Nashville. The features below highlight some of the studies emerging from the conference that are relevant to emergency physicians. Differentiating Acute Stroke From Mimics The Particulars: At hospital admission, elevated blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke is common and has been linked to poor outcomes. However, little is known about the natural history of prehospital BP in suspected stroke patients. Data Breakdown: Investigators analyzed data on nearly 900 patients with emergency medical services dispatch codes for suspected stroke for a study. Average systolic BP levels were higher in acute stroke (155 mm Hg) when compared with stroke mimics (143 mm Hg), and higher in intracerebral hemorrhage (171 mm Hg) than both ischemic stroke (155 mm Hg) and transient ischemic attack (153 mm Hg). Take Home Pearl: Prehospital systolic BP appears to be higher in patients with acute stroke when compared with those who have stroke mimics and may help differentiate these patients. A Different Way to Predict Stroke Outcomes The Particulars: Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) can help predict long-term neurologic deficits and mortality in stroke patients, but current methods for measuring ICP have limited accuracy. Optic nerve ultrasound may provide a non-invasive way to measure optic nerve sheath dimension for valuable ICP monitoring. Data Breakdown: For a study, bedside optic nerve ultrasound was performed on the day of admission and the following day among stroke patients. Significant differences in average optic nerve sheath diameter were observed between patients who died and those who did not. For every 0.1 cm...
Life Expectancy in 2013

Life Expectancy in 2013

Life expectancy at birth represents the average number of years that a group of infants would live if the group was to experience throughout life the age-specific death rates present for their year of...
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