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Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs: Lessons for ED Personnel

Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs: Lessons for ED Personnel

Outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMGs) are an iconic element of the criminal landscape in the United States. “When an injured member of an OMG is brought to the ED, other members and associates are likely to come to the ED to support him,” say Anand N. Bosmia and colleagues. “The arrival of injured outlaw bikers and their associates can be concerning to ED personnel because of their potential for aggression and violence. Increasing knowledge on the symbols, values, and hierarchy of OMGs may help ED personnel understand the mentality of outlaw bikers and thereby optimize management strategies.” In a study published in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Bosmia and colleagues discuss various aspects of the culture of OMGs to inform ED personnel about outlaw bikers. The study notes that OMGs pose a challenge for ED personnel because they are well-organized, have an intricate intelligence network, and are capable of mobilizing members quickly to assist injured comrades. Important Characteristics Many outlaw bikers refer to their organizations as “one-percenter” motorcycle clubs (MCs) rather than gangs. The term “one-percenter” originated from a statement made in 1947 by the American Motorcycle Association, which proclaimed that 99% of the motorcycling public abides by the law and the remaining 1% does not. Outlaw bikers wear the diamond-shaped “1%” patch if their MC is immersed in criminality and large enough to defend itself against all rivals. OMGs are divided into four categories (Table 1), with the larger one-percenter MCs topping the criminal hierarchy. Almost all OMGs in the United States are entirely Caucasian, and many of these one-percenter MCs are racist and have strong links to...
AAN 2015

AAN 2015

New research was presented at AAN 2015, the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting, from April 18 to 25 in Washington, DC. The features below highlight some of the studies that emerged from the conference. LOS & Return ED Visits in Stroke Patients The Particulars: The initial hospitalization for patients with acute, mild ischemic stroke can impact long-term outcomes. However, few studies have assessed whether hospital length of stay (LOS) is related to clinical characteristics, in-hospital care processes, and long-term clinical outcomes in this patient population. Data Breakdown: For a study, adults diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were grouped according to their LOS. Despite no significant differences between patients, researchers found that inpatient therapy evaluations took place later in those with a LOS longer than 1 day. Patients with an LOS longer than 1 day were more likely to return to the ED within 1 year. Take Home Pearls: Among ischemic stroke patients, time to therapy evaluation appears to be associated with LOS and risk for return ED visits. Coordination of inpatient care processes, along with assessment and treatment of comorbidities, may impact hospital LOS. Mental Illness, Substance Abuse, & Children The Particulars: Understanding outcomes among groups of patients at higher risk of primary and medication-induced psychiatric illness, such as those with neurological conditions, may help reduce the burden of mental illness. Data Breakdown: Study investigators compared mental health and substance abuse diagnosis patterns and length of stay (LOS) in children with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and Tourette syndrome with those of the general pediatric population. Depression was the most common psychiatric diagnosis in the general population as well as...
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