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Including Gender in EM Research

Including Gender in EM Research

Emerging data have demonstrated the value of gender-specific approaches in evaluating and managing health conditions, but it is unknown if emergency medicine (EM) has embraced the concept of ensuring that women are included in clinical research and that health outcomes are analyzed by gender. “Medical literature is filled with examples illustrating the differential effects of diseases and treatments on men and women, ranging from life-threatening conditions to public health issues,” says Basmah Safdar, MD, FACEP. “Gender medicine is not restricted to issues of women’s health and isn’t limited to reproductive organs, or the so called ‘bikini medicine.’ Emergency physicians are uniquely positioned to investigate and translate data into life-saving outcomes for both men and women.” A Closer Look In a study published in Academic Emergency Medicine, Dr. Safdar and colleagues assessed whether the effect of gender on health outcomes was examined in published EM studies. The majority of EM studies reviewed (79%) reported gender as part of the demographic composition of its participants. From 2006 to 2009, there was a 5% increase in the number of articles that analyzed the effect of gender on health outcomes. However, only 11% of the 750 original studies reviewed in the analysis included gender as a control variable, and 18% included gender as an independent variable. “Overall, just 2% of studies included gender in the primary hypothesis,” adds Dr. Safdar. Another 21% of EM studies did not even list the gender of participants. Use of gender in the analysis did not differ between NIH-funded studies versus non–NIH-funded studies. More Effort Needed “EM needs to make a more concerted effort to ensure that studies...
On the Unity of Doctors

On the Unity of Doctors

Doctors are facing challenges like never before. Not only are new medications being discovered and novel technologies being implemented, we are being bombarded with new regulations. Years ago, people were talking about how to improve the doctor-patient relationship. Currently, all the journals are talking about big data, EHR, meaningful use, and ICD-10. Not only do we need to stay current with all the medical innovation taking hold, we need to learn how to comply with all these regulations. Many doctors feel these requirements are actually not helpful as being touted. In fact, we feel there is harm being done because they are taking us away from direct contact with the patient. According to a study out of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, it has been estimated that ER docs spend 44% of time on electronic data entry and 28% on patient contact. Doctors are becoming increasingly vocal on speaking up against these regulations that we are forced to comply with. However, after years of being forbidden to unionize or collectively bargain, we are often doing it alone. We feel isolated in this sea of chaos. Polices will never change based on just one voice. If we are to drive policy change and shape regulations to become meaningful for the quality of medicine, we need to find a unified voice. How can doctors find unity and speak up against wrongful healthcare policies? 1. We can share information about these policy changes. We all need to stay up-to-date with them for our own practices. When we are aware, share them and discuss with other doctors why or why not these...
ACEP 14

ACEP 14

New research is being presented at ACEP 14, the American College of Emergency Physician’s annual meeting, from October 27 to 30 in Chicago. Meeting Highlights A Look at ED Care and ED-Direct Healthcare Costs Alcohol Use & Repeat ED Visits Reconsidering Physicians at Triage Outcomes With High-Risk Care Plans Triage-Leveling & ED Crowding   News From ACEP 14 ACEP14 HOT SESSION: Therapy for Non-ST Elevation ACS ED Physicians Should Handle High-Risk Abdomen Patients with Special Attention When Every Second Counts, Know When to Use tPA Nasal Foreign Body Removal and Other Quick ENT Tricks Rapid-Fire Review Outlines Do’s, Don’ts, and “Don’t Go There’s” It’s Not too Early to Start Planning for ACEP15 in Boston Everyday Leaders: Secrets of Great Leaders Through the Ages HOT SESSION: Smart Treatment for Sports Injuries Imaging Not a Necessity for Spine Evaluation in Trauma Patients Top Mobile Apps for Life in the ED Emergency Physicians Can Be “Voice of Reason” in Ebola Outbreak HOT SESSION: Tips on Avoiding Imaging Errors in the ED ACEP14: Pain Treatment Tips for Pediatric Orthopedic Injuries HOT SESSION: Fresh Perspective on Pain Management Google Yourself, and 5 Other Habits of Highly Successful Emergency Physicians ACEP Honors Groups in the 100% Club Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Improves Patient Care, Lowers Malpractice Risk HOT SESSION: How Emergency Physicians Choose Wisely Rising Star Award Caps New Speaker Forum on Wednesday Emergency Medicine Must Help Identify Research Problems, NIH official says ACEP14 Attendees Pack Freakonomics Opening Session HOT SESSION: Treating Dental Pain in the Emergency Deptartment New Ebola Guidelines for Emergency Departments Published by CDC Emergency Medicine of the Future Demonstrated at ACEP14...
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