CME: Examining Medication-Related Pediatric ED Visits

CME: Examining Medication-Related Pediatric ED Visits

Physician’s Weekly talked with Peter J. Zed, BSc, BSc (Pharm), ACPR, PharmD, FCSHP, and Neil J. MacKinnon, PhD, FCSHP, about their recent study that found that about one of every 12 emergency department (ED) visits by pediatric patients is medication related.      PW: What makes medication-related pediatric ED visits an important topic to study? PZ: Adverse drug events and patient safety in healthcare have come to the forefront in the last decade. Much of the work on adverse drug events and patient safety has been conducted in adults and pediatric patients are often under-represented or excluded from this work. As a result, there are gaps in the literature surrounding the understanding of the impact of adverse drug events in pediatric patients. NM: To date, no prospective trials have been conducted in this area. In the United States, we’re trying to reduce preventable hospital readmissions, and we know that many medication-related issues are preventable. ED visits can result in hospital admission, so tackling the issue of preventable hospital admissions from the ED is important.   PW: Tell us about your recent study published in Pediatrics. What was the purpose of this research? PZ: We wanted to understand the frequency, severity, preventability, and types of adverse events that occur in pediatric patients that are significant enough to bring them to the ED. We only considered the ED visit as medication-related if it was directly related to the use or misuse of their medications. NM: The goal of our study was to determine how many ED visits in pediatric patients are medication related, and then further divide those visits into severity level and preventability. Also, we...
Examining Medication-Related Pediatric ED Visits

Examining Medication-Related Pediatric ED Visits

Physician’s Weekly talked with Peter J. Zed, BSc, BSc (Pharm), ACPR, PharmD, FCSHP, and Neil J. MacKinnon, PhD, FCSHP, about their recent study that found that about one of every 12 emergency department (ED) visits by pediatric patients is medication related.      PW: What makes medication-related pediatric ED visits an important topic to study? PZ: Adverse drug events and patient safety in healthcare have come to the forefront in the last decade. Much of the work on adverse drug events and patient safety has been conducted in adults and pediatric patients are often under-represented or excluded from this work. As a result, there are gaps in the literature surrounding the understanding of the impact of adverse drug events in pediatric patients. NM: To date, no prospective trials have been conducted in this area. In the United States, we’re trying to reduce preventable hospital readmissions, and we know that many medication-related issues are preventable. ED visits can result in hospital admission, so tackling the issue of preventable hospital admissions from the ED is important.   PW: Tell us about your recent study published in Pediatrics. What was the purpose of this research? PZ: We wanted to understand the frequency, severity, preventability, and types of adverse events that occur in pediatric patients that are significant enough to bring them to the ED. We only considered the ED visit as medication-related if it was directly related to the use or misuse of their medications. NM: The goal of our study was to determine how many ED visits in pediatric patients are medication related, and then further divide those visits into severity level and preventability. Also, we...