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Conference Highlights: ISET 2010

The International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy, or ISET, held its 2010 annual meeting from January 17-21in Hollywood, Florida. The features below highlight some of the news emerging from the meeting. For more information on these items and other research that was presented, go to www.iset.org. Can A Blood Test Identify Endoleaks? The Particulars: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) kill more than 13,000 Americans every year. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is less invasive than open surgical repair of AAAs, but a downside is that about 10% of such repairs result in endoleaks. To monitor for endoleaks, patients undergo CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months after EVAR and yearly thereafter. Data Breakdown: A study of AAA patients who had an endoleak and a simple blood test found elevated concentrations of a blood protein called matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Researchers determined that MMP-9 concentrations of 55.18 or greater helped to identify endoleaks with both high sensitivity and specificity. Results must be confirmed by a prospective clinical validation trial. Take Home Pearls: A blood test appears to be capable of detecting endoleaks after EVAR for AAAs. Use of this test may help prevent up to 90% of follow-up CT scans. Gender Differences in Treatment of Blocked Leg Arteries The Particulars: Narrowed and blocked leg arteries are a common symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). About 8 million Americans have PAD, which can cause pain while walking. In extreme cases, these blocked leg arteries can lead to gangrene, lower-extremity amputations, or death. Data Breakdown: A retrospective study reviewed the use of endovascular therapy for blocked leg arteries. After 2 years, 46% of treated...
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