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Stratifying Risk in SCD: Planning for the Future

Stratifying Risk in SCD: Planning for the Future

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States and is responsible for more than 600,000 mortalities each year, according to data from the National Center for Health Statistics. About half of these mortalities are classified as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Of these deaths, about half occur as a victim’s first recognized cardiac event. Research suggests that only a small number of those suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrests will ultimately survive these events. “SCD is a high priority public health problem that requires multipronged treatment and prevention approaches,” explains Jeffrey J. Goldberger, MD, a professor at Northwestern University’s Center for Cardiovascular Innovation. Recent reports indicate that the incidence of ventricular fibrillation as a cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been declining but continues to be a leading cause of SCD. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are effective but costly and have had a meaningful but, so far, limited impact on SCD. As a result, there are opportunities for new approaches to address SCD (Figure). Approximately $2.4 billion is spent each year on ICDs, but the medical community still has yet to identify the optimal method for determining which patients need these devices most. “Conducting research initiatives to improve our ability to predict risk would enable providers to target ICD use to the most appropriate recipients,” says Dr. Goldberger. “Under current prediction protocols, ICDs are not systematically reaching many patients who can benefit from receiving these devices. By assembling the right resources, there is hope that we can establish risk stratification standards that use medical resources wisely while saving the most lives.” Stratifying Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Developing effective strategies...
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