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A Look at Female-to-Female HIV Transmission

A Look at Female-to-Female HIV Transmission

Few cases of HIV transmission between women who have sex with women (WSW) have been reported in the United States, but these cases still can and do occur. Studies have shown that HIV can be transmitted by female-to-female sexual contact with unprotected exposure to vaginal or other bodily fluids and to blood from menstruation. Historically, confirming HIV transmission during female-to-female sexual contact has been difficult because other risk factors are almost always present or cannot be ruled out. “It can be difficult to determine if HIV was transmitted by female-to-female sex or other more common modes of transmission, such as injection drug use and heterosexual sex,” says Amy Lansky, PhD, MPH. A Case Report According to a report published in the Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, the Houston Depart­ment of Health contacted the CDC in August 2012 regarding a rare transmission of HIV that likely resulted from sexual contact between HIV-discordant partners. The women involved reported having unprotected sex during a 6-month monog­amous relationship. The woman with newly acquired HIV did not report any other recognized risk factors for HIV infection. The other partner was previously diagnosed with HIV and had stopped receiving antiretroviral treatment in 2010. In this case, laboratory tests confirmed that the woman with newly diagnosed HIV had a virus that was virtually identical to that of her partner. “This case was unique because the CDC was able to use both phylogenetic and epidemiologic data in the investigation,” Dr. Lansky says. The viruses infecting the two women had a 98% or higher sequence identity in three genes. The couple had not received any preventive counseling before...
ICAAC 2014

ICAAC 2014

New research is being presented at ICAAC 2014, the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, from September 5 to 9 in Washington, DC.   Meeting Highlights Big Benefits With Antibiotic Stewardship Programs Finding Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Clinical Education Key to Procalcitonin Testing Trends in P. aeruginosa Septicemia Recurrent CDI: A Look at Outcomes   News From ICAAC 2014 Coinfection less likely among children with pneumonia serotypes Ebola Response: Slowed by a ‘Perfect Storm’ of Setbacks Researchers propose new strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance In-house PCR had greater sensitivity than commercial test kits for detecting intestinal protozoa Hospitalization rates increased for patients with HCV, diabetes Antimicrobial dosing adjusted for weight led to cost savings Lab-developed, commercial assays performed comparably in norovirus detection Clinical outcomes did not differ between children with, without C. difficile Swiss MSM had vague awareness of HCV treatments, modes of transmission Antifungal’s Lower Side Effects Hold Promise Depression Linked to Postop Infection Diabetic Foot Infections Fall — Not! Short TB Regimens Disappoint Moxifloxacin Struggles Against Current TB Drugs: REMox Trial Quadruple Dosing of Doripenem Safe in Patients With CF Early targeted antibiotics improved outcomes in S. aureus bloodstream infections Combination drugs in the pipeline offer increased convenience, fewer toxicities for patients with HIV SAPPHIRE-I, II trials demonstrate minimal serious AE in HCV Vancomycin May Protect Against C. Diff Recurrence One Dose of Flu Drug Shortens Fever Single-step NAAT algorithm improved C. difficile detection Efficacy of triple therapy varied among Israeli patients with HCV Peramivir safe, effective in treating influenza symptoms Ebola in Spotlight   More From ICAAC 2014 Registration Hotel Rates & Map Schedule-at-a-Glance General Information Online...
2014 Physician Compensation Report Highlights

2014 Physician Compensation Report Highlights

A newcomer snatched a spot in the top 3 highest earning specialties – check out which one in our summary of Medscape’s 2014 annual compensation report! In this year’s Medscape Physician Compensation Report, a great turnout of over 24,000 physicians across 25 specialties shared their salaries, hours worked, and details of how healthcare reform impacted their healthcare environment. Salary increases were seen in all but six specialties, compared with last year’s 2013 Physician Compensation Report. ♦ The top three earning specialties this year are Orthopedics ($413k), Cardiology ($351k), and both Urology and Gastroenterology at $348k. ♦ The lowest earners remain roughly the same as last year, with Infectious Diseases specialists ($174k), Family Medicine ($176k), and Endocrinologists ($181k).     Source: Medscape. Other highlights from the report include: ♦ Rheumatology hands down had the highest increase at 15% this year. ♦ Nephrology had the lowest increase (8%). ♦ Specialties whose compensation declined this year included Pathology (3%), Radiology (2%), Pulmonary Medicine (2%), and Cardiology (2%). ♦ On average, men made 31% more than women in 2013, down from 39% in 2010. ♦ The highest earners live in the North Central ($257k) and Great Lakes ($258k) regions. ♦ The lowest earners live in the Mid-Atlantic ($240k) and Northeast ($239k) regions. ♦ Almost a quarter of physicians (24%) participated in an Accountable Care Organization, compared with 16% in 2012 and only 3% in 2011. ♦ About 25% of responders said they would drop insurers that pay poorly, while 39% said they would not. Interestingly, in the satisfaction portion of the survey, top earners (plastic surgeons, surgeons, orthopedists, radiologists, and anesthesiologists) were the least likely to...
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