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Identifying Post-Op Complications for Readmission in General Surgery

Identifying Post-Op Complications for Readmission in General Surgery

In June 2009, CMS began publishing 30-day readmission data for select medical diseases, resulting in hospital readmissions becoming an important metric for measuring the quality of patient care. The changing regulations issued by CMS means that hospital reimbursements can be reduced based on an adjustment factor determined by a hospital’s expected and observed 30-day readmission rates. These changes have also raised the bar for decreasing unnecessary surgical readmissions. In addition to the financial implications, unplanned hospital readmissions further limit hospital resources. For each patient readmitted, there is an opportunity lost to treat another patient who needs care (see also, Strategies for Reducing Hospital Readmissions). “Reducing the number of 30-day readmissions after surgery is important for institutions as well as patients,” says John F. Sweeney, MD, FACS. “Developing a better understanding of the predictors of readmission for general surgery patients will allow hospitals to develop programs to decrease readmission rates. Surgical patients are different from medical patients because surgery, in and of itself, places them at risk for readmission, above and beyond their medical problems. There is an opportunity to intervene preoperatively to decrease the risk of readmission postoperatively.” Important New Data on Hospital Readmission In the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Sweeney and colleagues had a study published that analyzed patient records of 1,442 general surgery patients operated on between 2009 and 2011. Of them, 163 patients (11.3%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge. There is a paucity of information focusing on readmission rates among surgical patients, says Dr. Sweeney. “Although factors associated with 30-day readmission after general surgery procedures are multifactorial,...
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