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Conference Highlights: ISET 2011

These features highlight some of the studies that emerged from the International Symposium of Endovascular Therapy 2011 meeting, including carotid angioplasty in high- and low-risk patients, safety and efficacy of cryoballoon angioplasty, drug-eluting stents for renal artery stenosis, and the management of critical limb ischemia. » Examining CAS in High- & Low-Risk Patients » Costs in the Management of Critical Limb Ischemia » Safety & Efficacy of Cryoballoon Angioplasty » Guideline Adherence for IVC Filter Placements Examining CAS in High- & Low-Risk Patient The Particulars: Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is an alternative treatment for carotid artery stenosis. Recent studies have shown that CAS appears to have superior short-term outcomes when compared to carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in high-risk surgical patients. However, there are little data on whether low-risk surgical patients have fewer risks with CAS. Data Breakdown: Researchers analyzed results of CAS in patients at high and low surgical risks. High-risk patients included those who were older than 80 and those with postoperative restenosis, prior neck surgery or radiation, contralateral occlusion, low or high anatomic lesions, unstable or severe coronary or heart diseases, and severe comorbidities. CAS appeared to be safe overall, with favorable low event rates in high-risk and low-risk patients. Low-risk patients had a trend toward lower death and stroke rates after CAS when compared with CEA, but this risk was not statistically significant. Take Home Pearls: CAS appears to be safe for both high- and low-risk patients with carotid artery stenosis. Its use should be expanded to low-risk patients as CAS is becoming the gold standard treatment for a carotid stenosis. Costs in the Management of Critical Limb Ischemia [back to top]...

Conference Highlights: ISET 2010

The International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy, or ISET, held its 2010 annual meeting from January 17-21in Hollywood, Florida. The features below highlight some of the news emerging from the meeting. For more information on these items and other research that was presented, go to www.iset.org. Can A Blood Test Identify Endoleaks? The Particulars: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) kill more than 13,000 Americans every year. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is less invasive than open surgical repair of AAAs, but a downside is that about 10% of such repairs result in endoleaks. To monitor for endoleaks, patients undergo CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months after EVAR and yearly thereafter. Data Breakdown: A study of AAA patients who had an endoleak and a simple blood test found elevated concentrations of a blood protein called matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Researchers determined that MMP-9 concentrations of 55.18 or greater helped to identify endoleaks with both high sensitivity and specificity. Results must be confirmed by a prospective clinical validation trial. Take Home Pearls: A blood test appears to be capable of detecting endoleaks after EVAR for AAAs. Use of this test may help prevent up to 90% of follow-up CT scans. Gender Differences in Treatment of Blocked Leg Arteries The Particulars: Narrowed and blocked leg arteries are a common symptom of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). About 8 million Americans have PAD, which can cause pain while walking. In extreme cases, these blocked leg arteries can lead to gangrene, lower-extremity amputations, or death. Data Breakdown: A retrospective study reviewed the use of endovascular therapy for blocked leg arteries. After 2 years, 46% of treated...
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