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Med School Debt & Resident Salary

Med School Debt & Resident Salary

Medscape’s Residents Salary & Debt Report 2014 was just released this week, surveying over 1,200 medical residents across more than 25 specialty residency programs. The survey focused on medical residents’ salary, debt, and overall experiences in residency. Survey results found that the average resident salary was $55,300. Other highlights from the report are as follows: * Average salaries were highest in the Northwest (71k); lowest in the Southeast (50k) * Residents in critical care received the highest salary at 65k * Family Medicine residents received the lowest salary at 52k * Average salaries increased from 51k the first year to 60k after the fifth year * Men and women made an average of 56k and 54k, respectively * Only 48% of men feel fairly compensated, compared to 57% of women * 58% of residents owe over $100,000 of medical school debt after 5 years in * 36% of residents owe more than $200,000 * The majority of residents (77%) felt that the hours worked are sufficient for training Results of the Medscape survey follow closely with the Association of American Medical Colleges’ recent statistics of the indebted graduates, class of 2013, in their Medical Student Education: Debt, Costs, and Loan Repayment Fact Card. According to the AAMC, the mean debt for residents attending a public institution was 162k, and the mean debt was 181k for a private institution. The AAMC reports that 79% of graduates owe over 100k, while 40% owe over 200k. In May, the New England Journal of Medicine reported that in inflation-adjusted terms, compensation has been essentially unchanged for 40 years. And according to a recent...
Guidelines for Managing Fever & Neutropenia in Cancer Patients

Guidelines for Managing Fever & Neutropenia in Cancer Patients

Neutropenia, a common condition among cancer patients that is caused by low levels of neutrophils, can be caused by cancer itself or by the types of chemotherapy used. People with neutropenia are much more likely to develop infections when compared with those who have normal blood counts. Febrile neutropenia occurs when patients with neutropenia develop fevers, which are a sign of possible infection. Typically, febrile neutropenia is treated by immediately hospitalizing patients and providing them with intravenous antibiotics to prevent life-threatening complications, such as sepsis. Recent studies, however, suggest that select patients who are at low risk of complications related to febrile neutropenia may be eligible for outpatient treatment. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has issued a clinical practice guideline update on the management of neutropenia with fever and for the prevention of related infections in cancer patients. ASCO also endorsed a related guideline for children with cancer. To develop these guidelines, an expert panel systematically reviewed evidence from relevant medical literature, including 47 seminal articles. “These guidelines are intended to help physicians identify patients at high risk of medical complications related to neutropenia with fever,” says Christopher R. Flowers, MD, MS, who co-chaired the ASCO expert panel that drafted the guideline for adults. “They also provide clarity on when preventive treatment for infection is needed.” Additionally, guidance is offered on managing select patients who can be managed safely at home during febrile neutropenia episodes. Hospitalizations & Assessing Risks According to Dr. Flowers, a priority of ASCO’s guidelines was to help clinicians identify patients with febrile neutropenia who do not require hospitalization. “The guideline will help spare...
Guidelines for CT Use in Lung Cancer Screening

Guidelines for CT Use in Lung Cancer Screening

In August 2011, results of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study found that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening correlated with a reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality of 20% when compared with radiography. In September 2011, the American Association of Thoracic Surgeons (AATS) launched a task force to interpret NLST and several similar European trials in order to establish guidelines on lung cancer screening. The resulting recommendations were recently published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. The AATS recommendations for use of LDCT in lung cancer screening were most heavily influenced by NLST. The study was specifically designed to answer whether LDCT could positively affect mortality risk for 30 pack-year smokers aged 55 to 74 with a baseline 10-year risk of 2% for developing lung cancer. The NLST also heavily influenced guidelines from other professional societies on LDCT screening. A Tiered Approach for Lung Screening The AATS guidelines use a three-tiered approach. In tier one, it recommends annual LDCT screening from age 55 to 79 for those with a 30 pack-year smoking history. The AATS recommends continuing screening to age 79 because: • The peak incidence of lung cancer in the United States is age 70. • The average life expectancy in the U.S. is 78.6 years. • Age alone is a risk factor for lung cancer. The AATS recommends that screening cease at age 79 because the advantages of early detection are unclear among those aged 80 or older.   Tier two includes yearly LDCT screening for patients as young as 50 with a 20 pack-year history of smoking and an...
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