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Optimizing Patient Education in Knee Osteoarthritis Care

Optimizing Patient Education in Knee Osteoarthritis Care

The goals of knee osteoarthritis (OA) treatment are to improve health-related quality of life and limit the progression of joint damage. “The optimal management of knee OA requires that patients be given a combination of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments,” says Pekka Mooar, MD. “Educating patients about the nature of their condition and strategies to manage it is important when caring for these individuals.” Informing patients about the pros and cons of the various types of therapies to alleviate pain and improve function takes time, but Dr. Mooar says it is an important part of the process. “Recent guidelines from groups like the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons have provided recommen­dations for the non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic management of knee OA,” he says. “These guidelines make recommendations that are based on only well-designed studies with placebo controls. They do not support many of our traditional or surgical treatment options. For clinicians, this can make patient education even more challenging. Patients must be treated on a case-by-case basis, depending on their specific characteristics.” Lifestyle Interventions One of the most important aspects of managing patients with knee OA, according to Dr. Mooar, is to provide education about the objectives of treatments and the importance of lifestyle changes. “Patients should recognize that they can take action to reduce their chances of requiring knee surgery or arthroplasty,” he says. “Lifestyle changes are among the most effective non-operative treatments, but these options are best used when patients with knee OA are identified early.” Guidelines recommend that patients with knee OA be encouraged to undertake regular aerobic, muscle strengthening, and range of motion exercises,” says Dr. Mooar....

Interventional Nephrologists — What Specialty is Next?

A recent article on MedPage Today opened my eyes to a new and apparently growing subspecialty—interventional nephrology. In case you haven’t heard, nephrologists are apparently dissatisfied with the service they are receiving from surgeons and interventional radiologists, who are supposedly not sensitive to the needs of patients requiring renal biopsies and dialysis access. Interventional nephrologists are performing procedures such as ultrasound-guided biopsies, insertion of peritoneal dialysis catheters, placement of stents, declotting arteriovenous fistulas, and even creating AV fistulas for dialysis. Unbeknownst to me, interventional nephrology has been around since at least the year 2000 but is not yet a recognized subspecialty of internal medicine. Twenty centers in the US are offering training in some or all of these for varying periods of time. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has not accredited any of them, but a few are recognized by the American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology. Although the stated reason for the development of interventional nephrology as a subspecialty is for better continuity of patient care, it is also possible that nephrologists simply want to get in on the procedural side of medicine, which pays much better than the so-called cognitive side. A natural extension of this phenomenon would be for infectious disease specialists, who are notoriously underpaid and procedure-less, to start draining skin abscesses. Why stop there? They might as well do ultrasound-guided pelvic abscess drainages, laparotomies for perforated diverticulitis, and craniotomies for brain abscesses. What about pediatrics—another low-pay, no-knife specialty? They are already up most of the night answering phone calls from parents whose children have “fevers” of 99.8 degrees anyway. There is...
ASCO 2014

ASCO 2014

New research is being presented at ASCO 2014, the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting, from May 30 to June 3 in Chicago. Meeting Highlights Improving Prostate Cancer Screening Pillars4Life Online Intervention Improves QOL in Cancer Patients Discussing Clinical Trials With Lung & Colorectal Cancer Patients Perceptions on Novel Prostate Cancer Technology Assessing Mobile Apps in Oncology Assessing Prostate Cancer Incidence Rates Patients’ Actual Vs Preferred Decision-Making Roles Tobacco Cessation in Cancer Patients Second Malignancies After Prostate Cancer Treatment Discussing Costs of Cancer Care Under the ACA Practice Changing: Drug Preserves Fertility During Chemo Low-Dose Radiation Okay in Some HPV-positive Head and Neck Cancers Breast Cancer With Bone Mets: Less Zoledronic Acid Is Fine Palliative Care: It’s for Caregivers Too, Says Study Ramucirumab Hailed for Marginal Benefit in Lung Cancer New Targeted Drug Highly Effective in Advanced Thyroid Cancer Practice-Changing Results for Metastatic Prostate Cancer ASCO Sounds Alarm on Declining Federally Funded Research Bevacizumab, Cetuximab Have Similar Survival Benefits in CRC Two Major Trials: AIs Work in Premenopausal Breast Cancer Too Targeted Drug Combo Improves Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer   News From the Meeting A ‘Home Run’ in Prostate Cancer Tx Biologic Agents Plus Chemo Equal in Colon Ca Aromasin Better for Young Breast Ca Survivors Time to Change Lung Ca Surrogate Endpoint? Lenvatinib Slows Resistant Thyroid Ca Cyramza Boosts Survival in NSCLC Ibrutinib Proves Its Mettle in CLL OK to Cut Back on Bone Mets Therapy Early Palliation in Ca Patients Eases Caregiver Burden Drug Helps Save Fertility in Breast Ca OK to Stop Statins in Terminal Illness Myeloma Studies Presented at ASCO 50 Years of Progress,...
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