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Living for Yourself, Prioritizing Your Needs

Living for Yourself, Prioritizing Your Needs

Research indicates that physicians tend to put the needs of their patients before their own. “We’re never taught that we’re allowed to put any of our own needs first, or even that it’s sometimes healthy to do so,” says Robb Hicks, MD. “Unfortunately, this perception often continues when physicians are developing and maintaining a practice because it requires being as available to patients as possible.” Understanding Priorities Dr. Hicks says that physicians must ensure that their own needs are being met in order to be the best providers for their patients. “That means that physicians must prioritize their time and energy,” he says. “This requires us to put some of our own needs before those of our patients.” Providers who are unable to find a work–life balance are likely to burn out and make mistakes. “While we shouldn’t put all our needs first, we must make daily efforts to maintain our own physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional health,” Dr. Hicks says. “The key is to figure out what things are truly needs, and which are simply desires.” Once there is an understanding of priorities in their life, physicians must notice when their thoughts or behaviors are not consistent with their priorities. “It’s important for physicians to recognize when they sacrifice time with their spouse or their children, or when they give up their routine activities because of work obligations,” says Dr. Hicks. “This is when their priorities have become confused or are out of sync.” Making Positive Changes Recognizing that changes are needed and making these changes are two different things, according to Dr. Hicks. “The inability to create...

What’s the Point of Medical Licensing?

A surgeon emailed me the following:. OK, I know this is radical but consider my argument… Medical licensing protects no one and costs physicians hundreds to thousands of dollars each year. If a physician is negligent, can the injured party sue the state that licensed him? I’m guessing not. When I moved to my current location, I had to send lots of documentation to the state medical board so they could verify that I was a true and competent surgeon. I provided my employer with the same info so they could also verify my credentials. Now my employer can and will get sued if I commit a negligent act and absolutely should verify my credentials prior to handing me a scalpel. But the state? Its license is useless. Most people choose a surgeon based on recommendations and word-of-mouth reputation, and these are by far better indicators of quality than any credentialing board. Nobody asks to see my license, and, even if they did, it would not protect them any more than their trust in the health system in which I work. If I was in private practice and had my license displayed on my wall, it may give some reassurance to my patients, but it does not say anything about the quality of my work. Most doctors who really screw up due to negligence are licensed by the state. I contend again, that word of mouth and reputation are the best indicators of a surgeon’s ability, anything beyond that is useless. Caveat emptor, “let the buyer beware” remains the mantra of the informed consumer. Thanks for letting me vent....
Recognizing & Treating Caregiver Burden

Recognizing & Treating Caregiver Burden

Research has shown that unpaid family or informal caregivers provide as much as 90% of the in-home long-term care that is needed by adults. A 2009 study estimated that 65.7 million people in the United States served as unpaid family caregivers to an adult or child, two-thirds of whom provided care for an adult aged 50 or older. “The burden of caring for others is increasing because of our aging population, an increase in the number of people living with chronic disease, and a lack of formal support for caregivers,” says Ronald D. Adelman, MD. In addition to providing assistance with basic and instrumental activities of daily living and medical support, caregivers also provide emotional support and comfort. The economic burden of informal caregiving is substantial, with a recent study estimating that the cost of informal dementia caregiving was $56,290 annually per patient. Furthermore, many caregivers have little choice in taking on a caregiving role, and many report feeling ill prepared to take on these responsibilities. “Many caregivers are unaware of the toll that caregiving takes on them, making them more vulnerable to other serious health problems,” Dr. Adelman says. “In addition, caregivers often receive inadequate support from health professionals and frequently feel abandoned and unrecognized by the healthcare system.” Diagnosis & Assessment of Caregiver Burden In a recent issue of JAMA, Dr. Adelman and colleagues reviewed cohort studies and other analyses to provide strategies to diagnose, assess, and intervene for caregiver burden. Several risk factors for caregiver burden were identified, including female sex, low educational attainment, and residing with care recipients. Depression, social isolation, financial stress, a higher...
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