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New Guidelines for Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

New Guidelines for Managing Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes

In recent years, more pharmacologic agents and treatment options have become available to treat hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. With the influx of new therapies, it can sometimes be challenging for clinicians to integrate these new therapies into treatment regimens. New guidelines and position statements from well-respected organizations can assist clinicians, but these documents evolve over time based on new information. Download free patient education brochures from the Patient Education Center, developed by Harvard Medical School. Insulin Therapy Click here to download Diabetes: Goals for Good Health Click here to download Several years ago, the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes convened a group that developed consensus recommendations for antihyperglycemic therapy in non-pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Since that time, more information on the benefits and risks of glycemic control has emerged. In addition, there is new evidence on the efficacy and safety of several new drug classes as well as the withdrawal and the restriction of others. Furthermore, experts are suggesting that greater attention be paid to moving toward approaches to care that are more individualized and patient-centered. New guidelines on the management of hyperglycemia have been published concurrently in the April 19, 2012 online editions of Diabetes Care and Diabetologia. “Guidelines are constantly in a state of evolution based on new information,” says Vivian A. Fonseca, MD. “This document reflects recent data and availability on multiple treatment options for a variety of patients. In addition, the American Diabetes Association updates its overall standards of care every January. These new guidelines take a more holistic approach, focusing on treating people as...
A New Program for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

A New Program for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

Every 17 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. More than 26 million Americans have diabetes, and about 90% of cases are type 2. Data from the CDC estimate that 1.9 million Americans were diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 (Figure). Many patients who are newly diagnosed with diabetes may be distressed after receiving the news. They may fear the worst about the treatments and lifestyle changes that lie ahead. Others may choose to ignore the disease or fail to grasp the severity of the situation. They may leave their doctor’s office with a poor understanding of what is required of them to get their diabetes under control so they can avoid serious complications, such as heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, amputation, and even death. A Critical Moment “It can be challenging for healthcare providers to get patients to understand the seriousness of their disease at the time of diagnosis,” says Vivian A. Fonseca, MD. Healthcare providers play a vital role in clearing up any confusion patients may have about their diagnosis. However, it can be difficult to inform patients about all the key components of managing their disease. Prescription drugs and lifestyle changes are required. Informing patients about why they need specific treatments is important, but key messages can be lost because of the psychological impact of being newly diagnosed. Assemble the Team “The dialogue between physicians and patients is important,” adds Dr. Fonseca. “Providers need to be open and honest with their patients and take the extra time that may be needed to address inquiries. At diagnosis, it’s...

Preventing Diabetes Complications to Improve Outcomes

More than 84 million people in America have diabetes or are on the verge of getting it, and 90% of these people have type 2 diabetes. Between 2002 and 2007, the cost of diabetes-related complications to the United States healthcare system more than doubled from $24.6 billion to $58 billion. In many cases, type 2 diabetes can be managed or avoided with lifestyle changes like weight loss and exercise. Unfortunately, many people with type 2 diabetes struggle to find the motivation needed to make these changes. As a result, they are experiencing life-altering complications such as heart attack, stroke, blindness, limb amputation, and kidney failure at alarming rates. New Survey Data A survey commissioned by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals and conducted by Sermo recently convened a multidisciplinary steering committee to assess attitudes about diabetes-related complications. It showed that complications are prevalent in type 2 diabetes. More than 40% of physicians surveyed said that over half of their patients develop at least one complication as a result of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Nearly all physicians surveyed (94%) believed that kidney health is an important consideration in understanding the risk of other complications, but 40% did not believe the majority of their newly diagnosed patients even know that type 2 diabetes can lead to kidney disease. “To reduce the disease burden, complications related to type 2 diabetes must be decreased.” Physicians participating in the survey reported that lack of motivation, lack of medication adherence, and an inability to lose weight were the most common reasons for ineffective control of their patients’ type 2 diabetes. Compliance with lifestyle modifications and medications and poor...
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