CME: Gender, Stress, & Acute Myocardial Infarction

CME: Gender, Stress, & Acute Myocardial Infarction

Studies have shown that women and younger patients are at increased risk for mental stress when compared with the male or older counterparts, respectively. Whether or not the same holds true for young and middle-aged patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been well established. “In general, psychosocial factors are increasingly recognized as important influences on patients’ health status and recovery after major health events,” says Xiao Xu, PhD. “However, studies focusing on AMI tend to recruit older patients. Therefore, little is known about how psychosocial factors may influence outcomes among younger people with AMI.”   A Look at Younger Patients Dr. Xu and colleagues conducted a study that looked at the implications of stress on health outcomes and recovery in younger AMI patients. Published in Circulation, the authors used data from the VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes in Young AMI Patients) study. “VIRGO is the largest prospective study that has been conducted in the relatively younger AMI patient population,” Dr. Xu explains. “When that data became available, it presented an ideal opportunity to conduct our analysis. Because the VIRGO study focused on a uniquely large sample of young and middle-age patients, we were able to look at how stress is associated with recovery at 1 month in a younger population and also assess how gender affects outcomes.” For the study, the researchers examined gender differences in stress, factors contributing to these differences, and whether these differences helped explain gender-based disparities observed in 1-month recovery after AMI. Data on more than 3,500 AMI patients aged 18 to 55 were assessed. Self-perceived psychological stress...
Gender, Stress, & Acute Myocardial Infarction

Gender, Stress, & Acute Myocardial Infarction

Studies have shown that women and younger patients are at increased risk for mental stress when compared with the male or older counterparts, respectively. Whether or not the same holds true for young and middle-aged patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been well established. “In general, psychosocial factors are increasingly recognized as important influences on patients’ health status and recovery after major health events,” says Xiao Xu, PhD. “However, studies focusing on AMI tend to recruit older patients. Therefore, little is known about how psychosocial factors may influence outcomes among younger people with AMI.”   A Look at Younger Patients Dr. Xu and colleagues conducted a study that looked at the implications of stress on health outcomes and recovery in younger AMI patients. Published in Circulation, the authors used data from the VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes in Young AMI Patients) study. “VIRGO is the largest prospective study that has been conducted in the relatively younger AMI patient population,” Dr. Xu explains. “When that data became available, it presented an ideal opportunity to conduct our analysis. Because the VIRGO study focused on a uniquely large sample of young and middle-age patients, we were able to look at how stress is associated with recovery at 1 month in a younger population and also assess how gender affects outcomes.” For the study, the researchers examined gender differences in stress, factors contributing to these differences, and whether these differences helped explain gender-based disparities observed in 1-month recovery after AMI. Data on more than 3,500 AMI patients aged 18 to 55 were assessed. Self-perceived psychological stress...