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The use of mannitol in HIV-infected patients with symptomatic cryptococcal meningitis.

The use of mannitol in HIV-infected patients with symptomatic cryptococcal meningitis.
Author Information (click to view)

Hu Z, Yang Y, Cheng J, Cheng C, Chi Y, Wei H,


Hu Z, Yang Y, Cheng J, Cheng C, Chi Y, Wei H, (click to view)

Hu Z, Yang Y, Cheng J, Cheng C, Chi Y, Wei H,

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Drug discoveries & therapeutics 2016 Oct 11()

Abstract

Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a common opportunistic infection with a high mortality rate in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It is unclear whether mannitol could be used to manage neurological symptoms in HIV-associated CM. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 33 patients with HIV-associated symptomatic CM at our hospital where mannitol was used to relieve neurologic symptoms. With the empirical mannitol therapy, patients had a median of 2 episodes (range, 1-6 episodes) of headaches the day at the starting of anti-cryptococcal therapy. The median score of pain intensity assessed by numerical rating scales was 7-point (range, 4-8 points). After the administration of mannitol, the score of pain intensity was reduced to 3-point or less. Three weeks after anti-cryptococcal therapy, 75.8% (25/33) of the patients did not report headaches. During the initial 3 weeks of anti-cryptococcal therapy, 13 patients had a total of 42 episodes of seizures. 97.6% (41/42) of the episodes of seizures were controlled after the administration of mannitol. Overall, 87.9% (29/33) of the patients survived more than 10 weeks without the need of therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Mannitol was used for median of 26 days (range, 1-85 days) in these 29 patients. One patient had permanent vision loss. This study indicates that mannitol may possibly relieve neurologic symptoms in HIV-associated CM. It is worth re-revaluating the role of mannitol administration as a symptom control strategy in mild cases of HIV-associated CM.

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