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Can regular dental visits prevent pneumonia?

Can regular dental visits prevent pneumonia?

Recent research from IDWeek 2016 examines the benefits of twice-yearly trip to the dentist in over 26,000 people. Nearly one million Americans become ill with the infection every year and 50,000 die. While it is more common among older people and those with conditions such as AIDS or lung disease, anyone can get pneumonia. Based on an analysis of a national database of more than 26,000 people, the new research found that people who never get dental checkups had an 86 percent greater risk of pneumonia than to those who visit the dentist twice a year. “There is a well-documented connection between oral health and pneumonia, and dental visits are important in maintaining good oral health,” said Michelle Doll, MD, lead author of the study and assistant professor of internal medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. “We can never rid the mouth of bacteria altogether, but good oral hygiene can limit the quanitities of bacteria present.” Findings Researchers analyzed data obtained from the 2013 Medical Expediture Panel Survey, which asks about healthcare utilization (including dental care), costs and patient satisfaction. They found 441 of 26,246 people in the database had bacterial pneumonia (1.68 percent) and that those who never had dental checkups had an 86 percent increased risk of pneumonia compared to those who had twice-yearly appointments. The body contains 10 times as many microbes (bacteria, fungi and viruses) as human cells on or in the body, from the skin to the gastrontestinal system (including the mouth). Some microbes are good and some are bad, but even bad microbes only cause disease under...
CDC Once Again Updates Zika Guidance for Pregnant Women and Women and Men of Reproductive Age

CDC Once Again Updates Zika Guidance for Pregnant Women and Women and Men of Reproductive Age

The CDC once again updates guidance for pregnant women and women and men of reporductive age for zika virus infection related to the ongoing investigation of local mosquito-borne zika virus transmission in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Summary The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) previously issued travel, testing, and other guidance related to areas of active Zika virus transmission in Florida. Because local transmission of Zika virus continues to be reported in Miami-Dade County, CDC is strengthening travel recommendations for pregnant women to Miami-Dade County and also reinforcing recommendations for use of protective measures to prevent exposure to Zika. CDC is updating recommendations to emphasize testing for pregnant women with an epidemiologic link to Miami-Dade County. An epidemiologic link means that they lived in, traveled to, or had unprotected sex with someone who lived in or traveled to, the designated area. In addition, CDC has made specific recommendations for areas of identified active transmission. The Florida Department of Health (FL DOH) has identified a new area where local, state, and CDC officials have determined that the intensity of Zika virus transmission presents a significant risk to pregnant women in a designated one-square-mile area located in Miami-Dade County (NW 79th St. to the north, NW 63rd St. to the south, NW 10th Ave. to the west and N. Miami Ave. to the east). Pregnant women should consider postponing travel to all areas of Miami-Dade County. Pregnant women should specifically avoid travel to the previously identified 4.5-square-mile area of Miami Beach and onesquare-mile area in Little River located in Miami-Dade County (http//www.cdc.gov/zika/intheus/floridaupdate.html). Pregnant women who have an epidemiologic link to...
North American Spine Society, Oct. 26-29

North American Spine Society, Oct. 26-29

The North American Spine Society 31st Annual Meeting The annual meeting of the North American Spine Society was held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Boston and attracted approximately 5,000 participants from around the world, including orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, neurology, radiology, and anesthesiology specialists, as well as researchers, physical therapy specialists, and other spine care professionals. The conference featured presentations focusing on the latest advances in medical and surgical spine care. In one study, Federico P. Girardi, M.D., of the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, and colleagues measured the amount of pain improvement received among 422 lumbar surgery patients two years after surgery and compared it to the amount of pain improvement expected before surgery. “Two years after surgery, 11 percent of patients reported no improvement in pain, 28 percent reported a little to moderate improvement, 44 percent reported a lot of improvement, and 17 percent reported complete improvement,” Girardi said. “Overall, 56 percent of patients received less improvement in pain than expected; most of these patients had expected complete improvement.” In multivariable analysis, the investigators also noted that patients reported less pain improvement if before surgery they expected greater pain improvement, had a positive screen for depression, had a degenerative diagnosis, and if, after surgery, they required a repeat surgery and had greater back and leg pain. Press Release During a forum on gender difference in spine care, Gregory L. Whitcomb, D.C., from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Madison, moderated a discussion on variations in spine care based on sex and gender. The presenters discussed how significant disparities exist in the health care needs...
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