4 Ways to Improve Patient Flow and Avoid Scheduling Problems

4 Ways to Improve Patient Flow and Avoid Scheduling Problems

The author of this article is Judy Capko, a practice management consultant with Capko & Morgan. Scheduling problems are a common practice-wide issue, but here are some helpful strategies to deal with this important work flow issue: Identify trends. Tools are available to better understand specific scheduling and to track patient flow problems. Look at 2 weeks of data to identify trends and causes of these problems. Establish a baseline. Determine what is considered “on schedule.” Be sure to look at scheduling patterns for total length of patient visits rather than appointment length. Adjust schedules. Some problems in work flow aren’t too difficult to fix, but the key is to schedule realistically based on the time needs of providers. Consider longer scheduled time slots for patients with multiple care issues. Efficiency can also improve if nurses are trained to take on more clinical-support responsibilities. Avoid double booking. Try scheduling “work-in” patients alongside a new patient visit. This enables physicians to see add-ons while nurses work up new patients. If booking demands of the practice persist, find long-term solutions rather than continue double booking. Ultimately, practices should work as a team to find the best solutions for scheduling and patient-flow issues. Before implementing any changes, consider the practice’s specific needs carefully. Click here for the complete...
AAA Repair: Comparing Techniques & Mortality

AAA Repair: Comparing Techniques & Mortality

Clinical studies have shown that patient- and hospital-level factors often play a significant role in surgical outcomes, particularly mortality, for both general surgeries and vascular surgical procedures. “Although patient-level factors affecting outcomes after open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair are well described, few studies have examined the impact of hospital-level factors on mortality after these procedures,” says Caitlin W. Hicks, MD, MS. Previous research has indicated that mortality following open AAA repair (OAR) performed at high-volume hospitals is lower than that of OAR performed at low-volume institutions. Expert groups like the Leapfrog Group have advocated for a minimum volume criterion of 50 OAR cases or more per year as part of an evidence-based hospital referral safety standard. However, the effect of hospital volume on elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is currently unclear. “There has been a recent push to move AAA repairs to Aortic Centers of Excellence, in which elective AAA patients are triaged to high-volume academic centers,” Mahmoud B. Malas, MD, MHS says. “While such initiatives are expected to improve outcomes, it’s important to understand how hospital-level factors may impact postoperative outcomes before this step can be taken.” To address this issue, Dr. Malas, Dr. Hicks, and colleagues had a preliminary analysis published in JAMA Surgery that explored the role of specific hospital effects on mortality following OAR and EVAR.   Preliminary Research In the retrospective analysis, the study team used the American College of Surgeons’ National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, examining patients undergoing OAR or EVAR over a period of about 2.5 years. The group then compared 30-day expected mortality ratios based on hospital...
What public health really needs is a 90’s-style gangsta rap about…vegetables.

What public health really needs is a 90’s-style gangsta rap about…vegetables.

The following was pulled from PW partner ZDoggMD at http://zdoggmd.com/vegetables.  “What public health really needs is a 90’s-style gangsta rap about…vegetables. At least, that was the premise driving this collaboration with the band Rabbit! For those not in the know, Rabbit! genius Devin Moore (who does the lead vocal on this track) is also my audio producer and responsible for me sucking much less as a rapper/singer/musician than I deserve. He also appears in many of my videos (Alicia Keysboard in EHR State of Mind, Patient Zero in Readmission, Scared Bass Guy in Ebola, DevinMD in Blank Script, sex ed singer in More Than Warts, and weird mosquito guy in Zika). So when he was like, “Hey, can you drop in a 90’s style gangsta rap about vegetables at minute 1:55 in this tune?” And I was all like, “Can I? Do you see what I did there? ‘Can’ I? Like as in canned vegetables, see the joke? ‘Can’ has a double meaning. That’s what separates me from the other so-called public health medical rappers…” At which point he asked Coolio to do it instead. Unfortunately Coolio thought “vegetable” was a marijuana reference and subsequently wrote a very…um, child-unfriendly…set of rhymes. So here it is, with my part at 1:55! It’s a disturbingly catchy single, so share with kids everywhere so we can encourage them to eat more plants (which is a central premise of great nutrition). PEACE OUT! (apparently, that was a 90’s thing too, thanks...
Page 1 of 7512345...Last »