Advertisement

 

 

A Cross-Sectional Study of Depressive Symptoms and Risky Alcohol Use Behaviors Among HIV Primary Care Patients in New York City.

A Cross-Sectional Study of Depressive Symptoms and Risky Alcohol Use Behaviors Among HIV Primary Care Patients in New York City.
Author Information (click to view)

Algur Y, Elliott JC, Aharonovich E, Hasin DS,


Algur Y, Elliott JC, Aharonovich E, Hasin DS, (click to view)

Algur Y, Elliott JC, Aharonovich E, Hasin DS,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

AIDS and behavior 2017 12 06() doi 10.1007/s10461-017-1986-0

Abstract

An association between problem drinking and depression among HIV-infected individuals has been previously demonstrated; however, which specific risky drinking behaviors are associated with higher levels of depression has not yet been investigated. Using an adult sample of HIV-infected primary care patients (78% male, 94% Black or Hispanic), we investigated whether depressive symptoms are associated with various risky drinking behaviors. Participants were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II to assess depressive symptoms, and the Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-IV to evaluate alcohol involvement. Participants with depressive symptoms (26%) were at higher risk for alcohol dependence [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.8; 95% CI 2.0-7.2], regular binge drinking (AOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.1-3.8), and regular daytime drinking (AOR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.8), in comparison with their non-depressed counterparts. Because both depression and unhealthy drinking negatively affect medication adherence and clinical outcomes, a better understanding of the association between depression and certain risky drinking behaviors among HIV-infected individuals is vital to improving their care and prognoses.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 × 3 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]