Advertisement

 

 

A New General Method for Simultaneous Fitting of Temperature- and Concentration-Dependence of Reaction Rates Yields Kinetic and Thermodynamic Parameters for HIV Reverse Transcriptase Specificity.

A New General Method for Simultaneous Fitting of Temperature- and Concentration-Dependence of Reaction Rates Yields Kinetic and Thermodynamic Parameters for HIV Reverse Transcriptase Specificity.
Author Information (click to view)

Li A, Ziehr JL, Johnson KA,


Li A, Ziehr JL, Johnson KA, (click to view)

Li A, Ziehr JL, Johnson KA,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

The Journal of biological chemistry 2017 03 02() pii 10.1074/jbc.M116.760827

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated the dominant role of induced-fit in enzyme specificity of HIV reverse transcriptase and many other enzymes. However, relevant thermodynamic parameters are lacking and equilibrium thermodynamic methods are of no avail because the key parameters can only determined by kinetic measurement. By modifying KinTek Explorer software, we present a new general method for globally fitting data collected over a range of substrate concentrations and temperatures and apply it to HIV reverse transcriptase. Fluorescence stopped-flow methods were used to record the kinetics of enzyme conformational changes that monitor nucleotide binding and incorporation. The nucleotide concentration dependence was measured at temperatures ranging from 5 to 37C and the raw data were fit globally to derive a single set of rate constants at 37C and a set of activation enthalpy terms to account for the kinetics at all other temperatures. This comprehensive analysis afforded thermodynamic parameters for nucleotide binding (Kd, ΔG, ΔH, ΔS at 37C), and kinetic parameters for enzyme conformational changes and chemistry (rate constants and activation enthalpy). Comparisons between wild-type enzyme and a mutant resistant to nucleoside analogs used to treat HIV infections reveal that the ground state binding is weaker and the activation enthalpy for the conformational change step is significantly larger for the mutant. Further studies to explore the structural underpinnings of the observed thermodynamics and kinetics of the conformational change step may help to design better analogs to treat HIV infections and other diseases. Our new method is generally applicable to enzyme and chemical kinetics.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

15 + sixteen =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]