In the context of the ongoing North American overdose crisis, a clear understanding of opioid prescription and usage trends is important. Although individuals with mood and/or anxiety disorders are a sub-population at increased risk of developing substance use disorders, they have been identified as more likely to receive opioid prescriptions. The primary objective of this study was to investigate differences in prescribed opioid-based pain reliever use between Canadians with and without diagnosed mood and/or anxiety disorders.
We utilized data from the 2015-2016 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), a population-based, cross-sectional survey. We examined self-reported diagnoses of mood and/or anxiety disorders and self-reported prescribed opioid-based pain reliever use. Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted odds of prescribed opioid-based pain reliever use associated with mood and/or anxiety disorders.
Our study sample had 2,810 individuals. The prevalence of mood and/or anxiety disorders and prescribed opioid use was 11.7% and 14.6%, respectively. Individuals diagnosed with mood and/or anxiety disorders were more likely to use prescribed opioid-based pain relievers compared with individuals without these diagnoses (OR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.64, 3.41), even after adjustment for age, sex, total household income, cultural/racial background, and chronic pain (AOR= 1.78, 95% CI= 1.23, 2.58).
Our findings suggest that mood and/or anxiety disorders were positively associated with prescribed opioid-based pain reliever use. Future research should investigate potential unmet healthcare needs among individuals with these conditions, as mood and/or anxiety disorders may be modifiable risk factors.

Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

References

PubMed